'Fossil fuel' theory takes hit with NASA finding

As more scientists come around to the creation side, more and more facts are coming out that destroy the myth of Evolution. Did you know man and Dinosaur walked the earth at the same time? What was the canopy made out of that protected the earth before the deluge??
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'Fossil fuel' theory takes hit with NASA finding

Post#1 » Sun Jan 22, 2006 9:33 am

'Fossil fuel' theory takes hit with NASA finding
New study shows methane on Saturn's moon Titan not biological
Posted: December 1, 2005
11:48 a.m. Eastern
http://www.wnd.com/news/article.asp?ARTICLE_ID=47675

© 2005 WorldNetDaily.com


Saturn's moon Titan (courtesy: NASA)
NASA scientists are about to publish conclusive studies showing abundant methane of a non-biologic nature is found on Saturn's giant moon Titan, a finding that validates a new book's contention that oil is not a fossil fuel.

"We have determined that Titan's methane is not of biologic origin," reports Hasso Niemann of the Goddard Space Flight Center, a principal NASA investigator responsible for the Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer aboard the Cassini-Huygens probe that landed on Titan Jan. 14.

Niemann concludes the methane "must be replenished by geologic processes on Titan, perhaps venting from a supply in the interior that could have been trapped there as the moon formed."

The studies announced by NASA
http://www.spaceref.com/news/viewpr.html?pid=18410
yesterday will be reported in the Dec. 8 issue of the scientific journal Nature. http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/va ... index.html

"This finding confirms one of the key arguments in 'Black Gold Stranglehold: The Myth of Scarcity and the Politics of Oil,'"
http://shop.wnd.com/store/item.asp?ITEM_ID=1769
claims co-author Jerome R. Corsi. "We argue that oil and natural gas are abiotic products, not 'fossil fuels' that are biologically created by the debris of dead dinosaurs and ancient forests."

Methane has been synthetically created in the laboratory, Corsi points out, "and now NASA confirms that abiotic methane is abundantly found on Titan."

The realization that hydrocarbons are produced inorganically throughout our solar system was a key insight that led Cornell University astronomer Thomas Gold to write his 1998 book, "The Deep Hot Biosphere: The Myth of Fossil Fuels." Gold wrote:

It would be surprising indeed if the earth had obtained its hydrocarbons only from a source that biology had taken from another carbon-bearing gas – carbon dioxide – which would have been collected from the atmosphere by photo-synthesizing organisms for manufacture into carbohydrates and then somehow reworked by geology into hydrocarbons. All this, while the planetary bodies bereft of surface life would have received their hydrocarbon gifts by purely abiogenic causes.

Gold wryly noted that he was sure there had not been any "big stagnant swamps on Titan" to produce the biological debris that conventionally trained geologists think was required on Earth to produce oil and natural gas as a "fossil fuel."

"If petroleum and natural gas are abiotic as we maintain in 'Black Gold Stranglehold,'" Corsi commented, "then the 'peak oil' fear that we are going to run out of oil may have been based on a giant misconception."

Paradigms in science change slowly and with great resistance, he noted, "But NASA has given us today incontrovertible evidence that Titan has abundant inorganic methane."

"If the scientists have ruled out that biological processes created methane on Titan, why do petro-geologists still argue that natural gas on Earth is of biological origin?" Corsi asked.

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'Black Gold' strikes Big Oil 'nerve'
http://www.wnd.com/news/article.asp?ARTICLE_ID=47439
'Hundreds of years' of oil available
http://www.wnd.com/news/article.asp?ARTICLE_ID=47142
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http://www.wnd.com/news/article.asp?ARTICLE_ID=46888

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Forget everything you think you know about oil

Post#2 » Sun Jan 22, 2006 9:40 am

WND BOOKS
Forget everything you think you know about oil
'Black Gold Stranglehold' explodes common myths

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Posted: October 18, 2005
1:00 a.m. Eastern
http://www.wnd.com/news/article.asp?ARTICLE_ID=46888


© 2005 WorldNetDaily.com


If you believe that oil is a fossil fuel, be prepared to have your thoughts turned upside down.

If you believe that the U.S. has no choice but to rely on foreign oil until we ultimately run out of the precious resource, prepare to be challenged by new views that "have the opportunity to help give birth to a new generation of oil politics and economics."




WND Books' newest release, "Black Gold Stranglehold: The Myth of Scarcity and the Politics of Oil," by Jerome R. Corsi and Craig R. Smith, explores and debunks some of the popular myths surrounding the international and domestic politics of oil production and consumption to provide Americans with beneficial information while being held in a virtual stranglehold at the gas-pumps.


In "Black Gold Stranglehold," Corsi and Smith expose the fraudulent science and irresponsible politics that have been sold to American people in order to enslave them. By debunking several myths, Corsi and Smith provide an outline for progress that would help to establish America as energy-independent.

Be prepared to be challenged by:


The myth of fossil fuels: Corsi and Smith argue that the deep abiotic theory of oil is a more reliable theory than the fossil fuel theory. It rejects the contention that oil was formed from the remains of plant and animal life that died millions of years ago. Instead, they believe in Thomas Gold's argument that oil is abiotic: "a primordial material that the earth forms and exudes on a continual basis" and is "pushed upward toward the earth's surface by the intense pressures of the earth's core and the influence of the centrifugal force that the earth exerted upon the specific gravity of oil as a fluid substance."

The running-out-of-oil myth: The 1970s scientific study known as Hubbert's Peak, predicting we would exhaust oil reserves by 2003, has been proven false. We are currently sitting on "more proven petroleum reserves than ever before despite the increasing rate at which we are consuming petroleum products. New and gigantic oil fields are being discovered at an increasing rate, in places the fossil fuel theory would never have been predicted as possible.

The global warming hoax and other environmental myths: Corsi and Smith present compelling evidence that "burning fossil fuels does not release into the air chlorofluorocarbons or halon compounds, the types of chemicals identified as the culprits causing holes in the ozone." Instead, "human beings breathe in oxygen and exhale carbon dioxide" while "plants absorb carbon dioxide and throw out oxygen."

The folly of oil conservation: "Black Gold Stranglehold" presents and documents how no alternative energy option has been able to provide enough energy and how each alternative has been deemed uneconomical.

Oil playing a part in the illegal-immigration problem: Mexico has the third largest proven reservoirs of crude oil in the Western Hemisphere behind Venezuela and the U.S. As a result, the United States imports virtually all the oil Mexico exports. Consequently, "the U.S. government finds it difficult to take a systematic, hard look at the nearly free flow of illegal immigrants coming across our southern border. As a hedge against instability in the Middle East, the U.S. government has to calculate our oil needs when considering any steps we take regarding Mexico or illegal immigrants.

The value of the dollar and its effect on terrorism: "In recent years the buying power of the dollar has decreased 40 percent on the average against all major foreign currencies. Since dollars can no longer be exchanged for gold, no hard, fixed commodity stands behind the U.S. international payments, including oil purchases. Osama bin Laden's "war against America was fueled by his belief that the U.S. has stolen the oil of Muslim countries. At the core of the issue is bin Laden's perception that America has paid for oil, a hard commodity, with paper dollars that are no longer backed as they once were by the hard commodity of gold."

How high the price of oil?: "Today, the U.S. oil industry is sitting on a quantity of oil reserves that has never been higher. Still, we have built no new refineries, and the refineries in operation are producing at or near capacity. The picture that emerges is one of industry conglomerates simply sitting on large reserves and waiting for oil prices to go even higher. At some point, increased gasoline prices become an inevitable drag on the economy."

Terrorism and Its Threat to Oil: Terrorists are "willing to bet that the U.S. will not be able to afford politically or economically a protracted global war against radical Islamic terrorism. Terrorists, like governments determined to impose price controls on oil, act to disrupt free markets. In doing so, they clearly understand the economic harm they can inflict."


Corsi and Smith believe that America can and will become energy independent if some steps are taken to correct the aforementioned problems. In addition, they not only meticulously lay out the problems facing American oil interests, but have developed a seven-step action toward U.S. Oil Independence by:

Promoting scientific research to investigate alternative theories.


Expediting leases offshore and in Alaska to encourage oil exploration.

Providing tax credits for deep-drilling oil exploration.

Creating an oil research institute to serve as a clearinghouse of oil industry information.

Developing a public broadcasting television series devoted to the oil industry.

Reestablishing a gold-backed international trade dollar.

Establishing tax incentives for opening new refineries in the U.S.
In the end, "Black Gold Stranglehold" not only provides solutions, but it will empower consumers and oil industry professionals to drastically change the debate about oil. This book is sure to cause thoughtful people to reconsider the U.S. dependence on foreign oil and its effects on our economy.

"Black Gold Stranglehold: The Myth of Scarcity and the Politics of Oil" is available at ShopNetDaily.

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'Black Gold' strikes Big Oil 'nerve'

Post#3 » Sun Jan 22, 2006 9:41 am

'Black Gold' strikes Big Oil 'nerve'
Leading industry website drops book, column amid complaints

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Posted: November 17, 2005
1:00 a.m. Eastern
http://www.wnd.com/news/article.asp?ARTICLE_ID=47439


© 2005 WorldNetDaily.com

Responding to complaints from customers, a leading petroleum industry website stopped its sale of WND Books' "Black Gold Stranglehold: The Myth of Scarcity and the Politics of Oil," which challenges the conventional wisdom on the commodity's origin and supply.
http://shop.wnd.com/store/item.asp?ITEM_ID=1769

Houston-based Rigzone.com also pulled from its site a related column by a co-author of the book, Jerome Corsi, after receiving about a dozen complaints from subscribers, who include leading figures in the oil exploration community.


Corsi said the incident, along with many ad hominem attacks he and co-author Craig R. Smith have received, illustrate the general unwillingness of opponents to address the book's arguments.

"They don't want to debate us, they want to shut it out," Corsi said.


Jerome Corsi

He added, "It's usually a good indication you're on to something."

Building on the conclusions of Cornell University Professor Thomas Gold, Corsi and Smith argue oil is not a fossil fuel and – contrary to the popular "peak oil" theory – is not running out. Gold's "abiotic" theory asserts oil is a product of a continuing biochemical reaction below the earth's surface that is brought to attainable depths by the centrifugal forces of the earth's rotation.

Smith, CEO of Swiss America Trading Corp., said all he wants is an honest debate.

"The peak oil theorists have a wrap on this," he said. "Show us the science that proves we're idiots and we'll shut up and go away."

Rigzone.com President David Kent told WND he was caught in the middle of a controversy he's not "up to speed on" and discovered just how sensitive the issue is to people in the industry.

"A nerve has been struck," said Kent, who describes his website as the "Yahoo.com of oil and gas."

The e-mail responses came after he distributed Corsi's column in a newsletter last week sent to about 100,000 customers. Kent said if he had to do it over again, he would have included a disclaimer stating the views of the book and column do not represent Rigzone.com.

"I definitely knew it was on the edge," he said of the column. "But I didn't know what kind of response it would get."

Kent said he is considering holding an online forum on the topic.

A man who identified himself as a project engineer posted a copy of his letter to Rigzone on a community Web forum called The Oil Drum, saying, "I just wanted to let you know that with your recent 'insight' article by Jerome Corsi espousing abiotic oil and bashing peak oil and Democrats, you have damaged your reputation with me and others and I will no longer be using your site. That you would give a man with no engineering background, and the man responsible for the swift boat veterans book, space on your website beggars belief."

The letter followed a posting of a column by Stuart Staniford, who claimed Rigzone.com fired the editors responsible for posting Corsi's column.

But Kent denied that, explaining the erroneous report came from a misinterpretation of an e-mail that was meant in jest.

Staniford's column is titled "The Swiftboating of Peak Oil," an allusion to Corsi's co-authorship of "Unfit for Command," the New York Times No. 1 best-seller during the 2004 presidential campaign that challenged Sen. John Kerry's claims about his Navy swiftboat service in Vietnam.

Staniford said Corsi "can perhaps be forgiven for his … allegiance to the abiotic theory which has roughly zero support amongst working exploration geologists. … But what on earth are the editors of Rigzone thinking?"

Secondly, Staniford writes, "given Dr Corsi's recent history of involvement with well-funded extreme right-wing causes, are we seeing the start of a comparable campaign against peak oil?"

On a weblog called Peak Energy, a contributor posted a sarcastic response to "Black Gold": "Good heavens. Saint Jerome Corsi, paid liar and all around greaseball has found a sustainable, non-finite source of oil amongst the seminal soaked pages of Thomas Gold's masterwork?"

A contributor to a forum called Peakoil.com took a swipe at Smith and Corsi.

"Craig Smith is a gold bug. He would much prefer the U.S. dollar to be based on gold, not oil. (For 'black gold' read 'false gold'). Given the combination of authors, this book would seem to be little more than propaganda."


Smith contends the book is based on "rock-solid science" and that his and Corsi's research only serves to strengthen Gold's work.

In a WND column today, Corsi examines "fossil fuel" theory, arguing its assertions never have been scientifically proven.

Smith believes the oil industry has a "vested interest in having people believe [oil] is a very scarce commodity."




"It's only to the benefit of anybody who sells a commodity to have people believe it's running out," he said.

Knowing the origin of oil and its expected supply is crucial to the nation's policymaking, Smith argued, pointing out the U.S. economy is "absolutely predicated on having supplies of reasonably priced energy."

"If in fact we're running out of oil, then we are making good decisions about the political and economic impact that oil will have in our society," he said. "But if in fact it's not running out, we're making bad decisions."

Smith added that on one hand, the nation owes the oil industry a great debt of gratitude for all it has delivered.

"But by the same token, are they telling us the truth about supplies?"

Smith pointed out that from 1970 to 2005, the demand for oil increased 200 percent, yet today, there are at least 1 trillion barrels of proven reserves and as many as 7 trillion, according to one estimate.

"We're finding new oil fields every day of the week," he said.



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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Related column:

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Russia’s largest field is far from depleted
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Senate should make oil executives come clean
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'Hubbert's Peak' is a failed theory
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We will never run out of oil

Post#4 » Sun Jan 22, 2006 9:52 am

We will never run out of oil

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Posted: November 8, 2005
1:00 a.m. Eastern
http://www.wnd.com/news/article.asp?ARTICLE_ID=47276

© 2005 WorldNetDaily.com


In 1865, Englishman William Stanley Jevons, one of the greatest social scientists of his day, wrote an exhaustive study titled "The Coal Question: An Inquiry Concerning the Progress of the Nation, and the Probable Exhaustion of our Coal Mines." Jevons' argument was that England was about to exhaust all available coal resources, which inevitably would mean the collapse of the industrial enterprise upon which Great Britain's mighty empire depended. He wrote:


It will appear that there is no reasonable prospect of any relief from a future want of the main agent of industry (namely, coal).


And:


We cannot long continue our present rate of progress. The first check for our growing prosperity, however, must render our population excessive.


In contemplating his form of the Malthusian nightmare, W. Stanley Jevons was the M. King Hubbard "Peak-Oil Production" theorist of his day. Like the "Peak-Oil Production" theorists of today, Jevons' work is filled with detailed analyses of coal mines showing – mine by mine – the estimated amount of coal, the annual consumption of that coal (depletion ratio), and the duration of the supply, anticipating with uncanny precision the "bell-shaped curve" typical of M. King Hubbert's "peak-oil" graphs.

In his classic 1996 book, "The Ultimate Resource 2," debunking many different "doom-and-gloom" resource scares that abound in popular and scientific thinking, University of Maryland's professor of business administration Julian L. Simons, explained why Jevons was flat wrong:


What happened? Because of the perceived future need for coal and because of the potential profit in meeting that need, prospectors searched out new deposits of coal, inventors discovered better ways to get coal out of the earth, and transportation engineers developed cheaper ways to move the coal.


Insightfully, Julian Simons documented a series of authoritative predictions dating back to 1885, all warning that the United States would soon run out of oil.



1885, U.S. Geological Survey: "Little or no chance for oil in California."

1991, U.S. Geological Survey: Same prophecy by USGS for Kansas and Texas as in 1895 for California.

1914, U.S. Bureau of Mines: Total future production limit of 5.7 billion barrels of oil, at most a 10-year supply remaining.

1939, Department of the Interior: Oil reserves in the United States to be exhausted in 13 years.

1951, Department of the Interior, Oil and Gas Division: Oil reserves in the United States to be exhausted in 13 years.

When did Julian Simons think we would run out of oil? "Never!" was his answer. With 1.28 trillion barrels of oil in proven reserves today – more than ever in recorded human history, despite oil consumption in the world nearly doubling in the last three decades – we should seriously consider that Julian Simons might well be right.


"Peak-Oil Production" believers regard Shell Oil geologist M. King Hubbert as their theoretical deity. In 1956, Hubbert drew a bell-shaped curve that he said showed U.S. oil production would peak in the 1970s and decline from there until U.S. oil would in 2050 be nearly depleted. Subsequently, Hubbert's adherents have expanded his analysis into a worldwide prediction that we are running out of oil. Again, "Hubbert's Peak" theorists have serious critics, including prominent oil and gas analyst Michael C. Lynch. In a paper titled, "The New Pessimism about Petroleum Resources: Debunking the Hubbert Model (and Hubbert Modelers)," Lynch argues that Hubbart's initial analysis was anything but rigorous or scientifically formal:


The initial theory behind what is now known as the Hubbert curve was very simplistic. Hubbert was simply trying to estimate approximate resource levels, and for the lower-48 U.S. he though a bell-curve would be the most appropriate form. It was only later that the Hubbert curve came to be seen as explanatory in and of itself, that is, geology requires that production should follow such a curve.

Indeed, for many years, Hubbert himself published no equations for deriving the curve, and it appears that he only used a rough estimation initially. In his 1956 paper, in fact, he noted that production often did not follow a bell curve. In later years, however, he seems to have accepted the curve as explanatory.


Supporters like to argue that U.S. production "peaked" in 1970. To counter this claim, critics argue that U.S. production has only declined since 1970 because environmentalists and the political Left have aggressively blocked oil production in Alaska and offshore, where oil exploration has generated new finds.


In writing "Black Gold Stranglehold: The Myth of Scarcity and the Politics of Oil," Craig Smith and I have presented a 7-point plan we believe would allow the United States to increase domestic oil production to the point where once again the U.S. could approach oil independence.

In the first paragraph of his 2005 book, "Beyond Oil: The View from Hubbert's Peak," Kenneth Deffeyes, professor emeritus at Princeton, boldly predicts that world production of crude oil will peak in just a few days, on Thanksgiving Day 2005. What happens when crude oil production statistics show increases well into 2006? Will Kenneth Deffeyes eat crow for Thanksgiving Day 2006 if he is wrong? Probably not.

Most likely Deffeyes will simply readjust his theory and pick a new day for "peak-oil production," either that or he will assert he only meant the prediction metaphorically, not empirically. At any rate, Craig Smith and I are inclined to agree with Julian Simon. When will we run out of oil? "Never!" we too argue. The world has never had proven oil reserves as large as we have today and the trend shows no sign of reversing.





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Jerome R. Corsi received a Ph.D. from Harvard University in political science in 1972 and has written many books and articles, including co-authoring with John O'Neill the No. 1 New York Times best-seller, "Unfit for Command: Swift Boat Veterans Speak Out Against John Kerry." Dr. Corsi's most recent books include "Black Gold Stranglehold: The Myth of Scarcity and the Politics of Oil," which he co-authored with WND columnist Craig. R. Smith, and "Atomic Iran: How the Terrorist Regime Bought the Bomb and American Politicians."

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Abandoned oil wells uncapped

Post#5 » Sun Jan 22, 2006 9:58 am

Abandoned oil wells uncapped
Restarting of Southern California sites defies domestic shortage theory

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Posted: November 29, 2005
1:00 a.m. Eastern
http://www.wnd.com/news/article.asp?ARTICLE_ID=47618


© 2005 WorldNetDaily.com

Oil wells in California that were capped are now being opened because rising petroleum demand and new technology are permitting oil companies to profitably extract oil in the Golden State.

Wells that are 45 years old are being put back into production, with many wells in Los Angeles having been shut down after only 20 or 25 percent of the oil was extracted, reported the Associated Press. Current technology permits up to 50 percent of the reserves in a well to be drained before the well is capped. While California has some 3,000 abandoned wells, oil experts are predicting that all of them may soon be operating again.


"The decision to uncap California oil wells proves that U.S. oil production did not 'peak' because we ran out of domestic oil," comments Jerome R. Corsi, Ph.D., co-author with Craig R. Smith of "Black Gold Stranglehold: The Myth of Scarcity and the Politics of Oil." "Much oil in the U.S. has been kept in the ground awaiting new technology and higher prices. Truly, we do not know how much oil we have in the U.S. because environmental objections have consistently blocked efforts to explore for oil and natural gas offshore and in Alaska."

Corsi also points to the "Deep Trek" project, which has been launched by the U.S. Department of Energy to encourage U.S. domestic exploration in the United States. It utilizes ultra-deep drilling technology that permits oil companies to explore for oil at levels as deep as 3 miles underground. The Department of Energy reports that today 7 percent of the natural gas produced in the United States comes from formations below 15,000 feet. The agency estimates, however, that 125 trillion cubic feet of natural gas are trapped at depths 3 miles underground or more throughout the continental U.S. The "Deep Trek" project was kicked off in 2002 to develop the high-tech drilling tools the oil industry needs to tackle these deeper deposits.

John Martini, CEO of the California Independent Petroleum Association, told WND that many wells are being opened up because new technology permits companies to drill anywhere from 100 to 1,000 feet deeper with economically productive results.

"Oil production is like any other industrial process," Mr. Martini noted, "in that new technology lets you work smarter and more efficiently. Where before we might only have gotten 20 or 30 percent of the available oil drilled out of a particular well, we might today get 50 or 60 percent."

Another factor Martini cited was that the continued higher price of crude oil "puts in place a new set of dynamics, where smaller and smaller companies can come in and open up the capped wells profitably. California remains the fourth-largest oil producing state in America, and while our fields are considered mature fields, the new technologies may end up extending production another 15 to 20 years longer than expected."

"We have argued that deep-earth exploration of oil and natural gas is the fastest growing part of the oil business today," explains author Smith. "By looking deeper, we are finding oil and natural gas reserves that in previous decades our technology did not permit us to profitably produce. These developments, both the uncapping of wells in California and the deep-earth exploration for natural gas in the continental U.S., are important developments for increasing domestic energy supplies, developments which the public should know are going on."


Martini stressed that uncapping wells in California will not adversely affect California lifestyles.

"In many cases, the infrastructure is already in place," he told WND, "so putting these wells back into production will not cause an unseemly impact on the landscape."

Martini expects the new drilling will benefit Californians: "You have to remember that 100 percent of the oil refined in California is used in California. You might end up driving on an L.A. freeway using gasoline that came from a field we were able to put back in production right there in Los Angeles County, maybe not far from where you are driving."

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Huge natural gas field 'discovered' in Texas

Post#6 » Sun Jan 22, 2006 9:59 am

Huge natural gas field 'discovered' in Texas
Major energy firms seeing benefit in developing domestic sources

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Posted: November 30, 2005
1:00 a.m. Eastern
http://www.wnd.com/news/article.asp?ARTICLE_ID=47639


© 2005 WorldNetDaily.com

Though it's been in production for nearly 25 years, a huge natural gas field in Texas is now drawing the attention of major energy companies – but only after independent operations proved its worth.

Fort Worth, Texas, is built on top the Barnett Shale natural gas field, a field so vast that the U.S. Geological Service estimates it contains some 26 trillion cubic feet of yet-to-be-discovered natural gas. Estimates are that as much as 160 billion cubic feet of natural gas are in place per square mile in the Barnett Shale formation. The Barnett Shale field is the largest gas-producing field in Texas, covering some 15 counties in the northern part of the state. The core area comprises about 120,000 net acres that stretch north from Fort Worth to the western outskirts of Denton.


The field was undiscovered until 1981 when independent Mitchell Energy drilled the first well. The largest operator in the Barnett Shale field is Devon Energy Corporation, one of America's largest and most successful independent oil and natural gas companies, headquartered in Oklahoma City. In January 2002, Devon completed the acquisition of the field's pioneer, Mitchell Energy. Today, Devon operates more than 1,700 wells into the Barnett Shale core area, wells that today produce more than 550 million cubic feet of natural gas per day.

According to Brian Engel, manager of public affairs for Devon, the company's success in large part derives from developing a light sand, water fracturing technology that permits efficient natural gas exploration from the field.

"The Barnett Shale formation," says Mr. Engel, "has rightfully emerged as the largest natural gas field in Texas and one of the most important natural gas fields in the nation."

Now that the independents have proven Barnett Shale to be hugely productive, major companies including ExxonMobil, ChevronTexaco, ConocoPhillips, BP and Shell have moved in to buy up production rights.

"It makes sense," explained Tom Biracree, senior financial editor with John S. Herold Inc., an energy research and investment valuation firm based in Norwalk, Conn. "The industry is seeing a decided trend moving toward the development of on-shore natural gas resources in the continental U.S."

Why? "It's an economic market play," explained Biracree. "With the price of natural gas at $10 per thousand cubic feet, not $2, it becomes very attractive for the major industry players to focus more attention on exploring for natural gas right here at home."

Biracree continued, "Developing natural gas resources in the continental U.S. also permits the major companies to avoid the political risk of working overseas. The rules of the game don't change here like they can when you're dealing with a foreign government."

Biracree noted that the industry is learning today how to explore deeper and extract more natural gas profitably from what, in years past, were considered riskier enterprises.

"We have growing expertise in the technologies which make extraction of natural gas from shale profitable," said Biracree. "Besides, today the demand for natural gas is growing in the United States and the market has established very attractive prices. It's the same principle why Wal-Mart trucks in snow shovels in a snow storm." In other words, opportunities like Barnett Shale are market-driven.

Technically, the U.S. Geological Survey describes the Barnet Shale formation as the "Greater Newark East Frac-Barrier Continuous Barnett Shale Gas Assessment Unit." The rock is identified as a Mississippian formation, dating back some 330 million years. Geologists describe the formation as "source rock" or "reservoir rock," assuming that the organic material in the metamorphic shale has morphed into the "kerogen" traditionally assumed as needed to produce natural gas.



Barnett Shale is deeply fractured, with fissures that tended to be sealed by calcium carbonate. The field went undiscovered until Mitchell Energy experimented with employing large gel fracture methods to open the wells to natural gas. The full potential of the field waited for the light sand, water fracture technology developed by Devon Energy Corporation, a technology that fractures the shale so the natural gas can be extracted. The Barnett Shale formation lies at a depth of between 1 to 2 miles below the surface, with the shale running some 400 to 500 feet thick.

Commented Jerome Corsi, Ph.D., co-author of "Black Gold Stranglehold: The Myth of Scarcity and the Politics of Oil": "With the field only discovered in 1981, the Barnett Shale natural gas resources were not known when Shell Oil geologist M. King Hubbert started worrying about 'peak production.' With natural gas resources this abundant, we can be reasonably assured there remains a large quantity of natural gas to be extracted at home, right on the continental U.S. That abundance should be apparent even to those who want to maintain the doctrinaire position that the Barnett Shale natural gas is organic in nature."

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CNBC hosts 'Deep Oil vs. Peak Oil' debate

Post#7 » Sun Jan 22, 2006 9:33 pm

CNBC hosts 'Deep Oil vs. Peak Oil' debate
Author of 'Black Gold Stranglehold' to battle author of opposing book

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Posted: November 1, 2005
1:00 a.m. Eastern
http://www.wnd.com/news/article.asp?ARTICLE_ID=47142


© 2005 WorldNetDaily.com


In what is sure to be a scintillating segment of television, Craig R. Smith co-author of WND Books' "Black Gold Stranglehold: The Myth of Scarcity and the Politics of Oil," will go head-to-head with author Matthew R. Simmons in a debate entitled "Deep Oil vs. Peak Oil" on CNBC's "Squawk Box" this morning at 9 a.m. Eastern.

Smith and co-author Jerome Corsi contend in "Black Gold Stranglehold" that oil is not a product of decaying dinosaurs and prehistoric forests, but that oil is constantly being produced by the earth, far below the planet's surface, and that it is brought to attainable depths by the centrifugal forces of the earth's rotation.


Simmons' "Twilight in the Desert" argues that oil is a finite resource and asserts that Saudi Arabia's oil production may have already peaked, leaving the world in a politically and economically unstable situation.

Ultimately, infinite or finite oil reserves have serious economic implications. Smith's "deep oil" argument provides a perspective as to how America's unbalanced pattern of consumption and lack of production puts consumers in a virtual stranglehold by foreign governments, corrupt political leaders, terrorist organizations and oil conglomerates. Likewise, Simmons' "peak oil" claim puts consumers in a critical position if Saudi Arabia, one of the world's low-cost oil producers, experiences diminished reserves forcing the U.S. to buy oil from other countries at higher prices. With high prices at the gas-pump and record-setting heating-fuel costs, Smith and Simmons' debate is likely to highlight the contention that more needs to be done to address refining and exploration problems facing the U.S.

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