Constitution of the Free States of America

We can come together here to share ideas on how we can make this idea work, where a local community on a county level produces most if not ALL of their basic needs. You can choose to do it alone, with your family or make it work for your community. We need to change our raw materials from dead-hydrocarbon sources to a living-carbohydrate sources (HEMP). You will be amazed to see how many thousands of everyday used products are made from this bountiful raw material resource.....
pokerkid
Site Admin
Posts: 7781

Constitution of the Free States of America

Post#1 » Wed Jun 29, 2005 8:38 pm

Something to mull thru and consider.
pk

Constitution of the Free States of America
http://moronika.com/cfs.php

We, the people of the Free States, each State acting in its sovereign and independent character, in order to establish justice, insure domestic tranquility and secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity do ordain and establish this Constitution for the Free States of America.



Article I
Section 1. All legislative powers herein specifically delegated shall be vested in a Congress of the Free States, which shall consist of a Senate and House of Representatives.

Section 2. 1 The House of Representatives shall be composed of members chosen every year by the people of the several States, and the electors in each State shall be citizens of the Free States, and have the qualifications requisite for electors of the most numerous branch of the State Legislature; but no person of foreign birth, not a citizen of the Free States, shall be allowed to vote for any officer, civil or political, State or Federal.


2 No Person shall be a Representative who shall not have attained to the age of twenty-five Years and been seven Years a Citizen of the Free States, and who shall not, when elected, be an inhabitant of that State in which he shall be chosen. No person shall serve as a Representative for more than three years in every six.


3 Representatives and direct taxes shall be apportioned among the several States which may be included within this Confederation, according to their respective numbers, which shall be all citizens who have attained to the age of eighteen Years. The actual enumeration shall be made within three years after the first meeting of the Congress of the Free States, and within every subsequent term of ten years, in such manner as they shall by law direct. The number of Representatives shall be one for every fifty thousand, but each State shall have at least one Representative.


4 When vacancies happen in the representation from any State, the executive authority thereof shall issue writs of election to fill such vacancies.


5 The House of Representatives shall choose their speaker and other officers; and shall have the sole power of impeachment; except that a Representative, any judicial or other federal officer resident and acting solely within the limits of any State, may be impeached by a vote of two-thirds of both branches of the Legislature thereof.


Section 3. 1 The Senate of the Free States shall be composed of not less than two, nor more than seven, Senators from each State, chosen for three years by the Legislature thereof, at the regular session next immediately preceding the commencement of the term of service; and each State shall have one vote on all bills and resolutions. The Legislature of each State retains the right to remove a Senator from its delegation at any time, and to replace him with another for the remainder of the term.


2 Immediately after they shall be assembled in consequence of the first election, the States shall be divided as equally as may be into three classes. The seats of the States of the first class shall be vacated at the expiration of the first year, of the second class at the expiration of the second year, and the third class at the expiration of the third year, so that one-third of the States may chose every year; and if vacancies happen by resignation, or otherwise, during the recess of the Legislature of any State, the Executive thereof may make temporary appointments until the next meeting of the Legislature, which shall then fill such vacancies.


3 No Person shall be a Senator who shall not have attained to the age of thirty years, and been nine Years a Citizen of the Free States, and who shall not, when elected, be an inhabitant of the State for which he shall be chosen; and no Senator shall be eligibile to succeed himself.


4 The Senate shall choose their chairman and other officers; and shall have the sole power to try all impeachments. When sitting for that purpose, they shall be on oath or affirmation. When the President of the Free States is tried, the Chief Justice shall preside; and no person shall be convicted without the concurrence of two-thirds of the States.


5 Judgment in cases of impeachment shall not extend further than to removal from office, and disqualification to hold and enjoy any office of honor, trust or profit under the Free States; but the party convicted shall nevertheless be liable and subject to indictment, trial, judgment and punishment, according to law.


Section 4. 1 The times, places, and manner of holding elections for Senators and Representatives shall be prescribed in each State by the Legislature thereof, subject to the provisions of this Constitution.


2 The Congress shall assemble at least once in every year, and such Meeting shall be on the fourth day in January, unless they shall, by law, appoint a different day; and they shall adjourn their sessions no later than the last day of June, unless in time of declared war both Houses vote to remain in session, or if called into special session, as provided by this Constitution.


Section 5. 1 Each House shall be the judge of the elections, returns, and qualifications of its own members, and a majority of each shall constitute a quorum to do business; but a smaller number may adjourn from day to day, and may be authorized to compel the attendance of absent members, in such manner and under such penalties as each House may provide.


2 Each House may determine the rules of its proceedings, punish its members for disorderly behavior, and, with the concurrence of two-thirds of the whole number, expel a member.


3 Each House shall keep a journal of its proceedings, and from time to time publish the same; and the yeas and nays of the members of either House, on any question, shall be entered on the journal.


4 Neither House, during the session of Congress, shall, without the consent of the other, adjourn for more than three days, nor to any other place than that in which the two Houses shall be sitting.


Section 6. 1 The Senators and Representatives shall receive a compensation for their services during their days in Session, to be ascertained by law, and paid out of the Treasury of the Free States. No law varying the compensation for the service of the Senators and Representatives shall take effect until after an election of Representatives shall have intervened, provided the law be specifically approved at that election by a majority of the Electors in a majority of the States; and no such law shall include any automatic future increases or changes in that compensation.


2 No Senator or Representative shall, during the time for which he was elected, be appointed to any civil office under the authority of the Free States, which shall have been created, or the emoluments whereof shall have been increased during such time; and no person holding any office under the Free States, shall be a member of either House during his continuance in office. But Congress may, by law, grant to the principal officer in each of the executive departments a seat upon the floor of either House, with the privilege of discussing any measures appertaining to his department.


Section 7. 1 All bills for raising the revenue, or for making appropriations of the revenue raised, shall originate in the House of Representatives; but the Senate may propose or concur with amendments, as on other bills.


2 Every bill which shall have passed both Houses, shall, before it becomes a law, be presented to the President of the Free States; if he approve, he shall sign it; but if not, he shall return it, with his objections, to that House in which it shall have originated, who shall enter the objections at large on their journal, and proceed to reconsider it. If after such reconsideration two-thirds of that House shall agree to pass the bill, it shall be sent, together with the objections, to the other House, by which it shall likewise be reconsidered, and if approved by two-thirds of that House, it shall become a law. But in all such cases, yeas and nays shall determine the votes of both Houses, and the names of the persons voting for and against the bill shall be entered on the journal of each House respectively. If any bill shall not be returned by the President within ten days (Sundays excepted) after it shall have been presented to him, the same shall be a law, in like manner as if he had signed it, unless the Congress, by their adjournment, prevent its return; in which case it shall not be a law. The President may approve any appropriation and disapprove any other appropriation in the same bill. In such case he shall, in signing the bill, designate the appropriations disapproved; and shall return a copy of such appropriations, with his objections, to the House in which the bill shall have originated; and the same proceedings shall then be had as in case of other bills disapproved by the President.


3 No bill or resolution shall be brought up for a vote in either House unless the members of that House have been given at least 72 hours to read the bill or resolution being proposed. Every order, resolution, or vote to which the concurrence of both Houses may be necessary (except on a question of adjournment) shall be presented to the President of the Free States; and before the same shall take effect, shall be approved by him; or, being disapproved, shall be repassed by two thirds of both Houses, according to the rules and limitations prescribed in the case of a bill.


Section 8. 1 The Congress is delegated the power-- To lay and collect duties, imposts and excises, for revenue necessary to pay the debts, provide for the common defense, and carry on the government of the Free States, but no bounties shall be granted from the treasury, nor shall any duties, imposts or excises on importations from foreign nations be laid to promote or foster any branch of industry, and all duties, imposts, and excises shall be uniform throughout the Free States.


2 To promote free trade with foreign nations, and among the several States, and with the Indian tribes, by establishing a uniform commercial code; but neither this, nor any other clause contained in this Constitution, shall ever be construed to delegate the power to Congress to appropriate money for any internal improvement intended to facilitate commerce, nor shall the Congress promote or foster, nor prohibit or impair, any branch of industry or commerce.


3 To establish a uniform law of naturalization, and a uniform law on the subject of bankruptcies, throughout the Free States (but no law of Congress shall discharge any debt voluntarily contracted before the passage of the same.)


4 To coin money in gold and silver, regulate the value thereof, and of foreign coin, and fix the standard of weights and measures; but no law of Congress shall make anything legal tender other than gold or silver coin, nor shall Congress have or grant any monopoly to coin money.


5 To provide for the punishment of counterfeiting the securities and current coin of the Free States.


6 To constitute tribunals inferior to the Supreme Court.


7 To define and punish piracies and felonies committed on the high seas and in the air, and offenses against the law of nations.


8 To declare war against any nation, state, or people who invades and attacks the Free States, or any of them, provided two-thirds of the whole numbers of both Houses concur, and no act of Congress shall delegate the power to declare war, or to otherwise initiate the use of force against another nation, state or people, to any other person.


9 To grant letters of marque and reprisal, and make rules concerning captures on land and water.


10 To provide for calling forth the militia, being all citizens who have attained the age of eighteen years and who are able and willing to bear arms, to repel invasions.


11 To provide for organizing, arming, and disciplining the militia, and for governing such part of them as may be employed in the defense of the Free States; reserving to the States respectively, the appointment of the officers, and the authority of training the militia according to the discipline prescribed by Congress.


12 To exercise exclusive legislation over all places purchased by the consent of the Legislature of the State in which the same shall be, for the erection of forts, magazines, arsenals, dockyards, and similar needful buildings; and


13 To make such laws which may be necessary for carrying into execution the foregoing powers, and all other powers vested by this Constitution in the government of the Free States, or in any department or officer thereof.


Section 9. 1 Slavery and involuntary servitude is prohibited throughout the Free States. No person shall ever be compelled to serve in the armed forces or the militia against his will, or be otherwise compelled to do service for the government of the Free States, or any of them.


2 The power of eminent domain, being repugnant to a free people, is prohibited throughout the Free States, and no property shall be taken for any use without full compensation and the free and voluntary consent of the owner.


3 The privilege of the writ of habeas corpus shall never be suspended or denied.


4 No bill of attainder or ex post facto law, or law denying, abridging or impairing the right of property, shall be passed.


5 No capitation or other direct tax shall be laid.


6 No tax or duty shall be laid on articles exported from any State.


7 No preference shall be given by any regulation of commerce or revenue to the ports of one State over those of another: nor shall Vessels bound to, or from, one State, be obliged to enter, clear or pay Duties in another.


8 No money shall be drawn from the Treasury, but in consequence of appropriations made by law; and a regular statement and account of receipts and expenditures of all public money shall be published from time to time.


9 Congress shall appropriate no money from the Treasury except by a vote of two-thirds of both Houses, taken by yeas and nays, unless it be asked and estimated for by some one of the heads of departments and submitted to Congress by the President; or for the purpose of paying its own expenses and contingencies; or for the payment of claims against the Free States, the justice of which shall have been judicially declared by a tribunal for the investigation of claims against the Government, which it is hereby made the duty of Congress to establish


10 All bills for appropriating money shall specify in Federal coin the exact amount of each appropriation and the purposes for which it is made; and Congress shall grant no extra compensation to any public contractor, officer, agent, or servant, after such contract shall have been made or such service rendered.


11 No title of nobility or special privilege shall be granted by the Free States tp any person or group of persons; and no person holding any office of profit or trust under them shall accept of any present, emolument, office, or title, of any kind whatever, from any king, prince, or foreign state.


12 If any citizen of the Free States shall accept, claim, receive, or retain any title of nobility or honour, or shall without the consent of Congress, accept and retain any present, pension, office, or emolument of any kind whatever, from any emperor, king, prince, or foreign power, such person shall cease to be a citizen of the Free States, and shall be incapable of holding any office of trust or profit under them, or either of them.


13 The right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed or impaired in any manner.


14 No soldier or agent of the government shall be quartered in any house without the free and voluntary consent of the owner.


15 The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, businesses, vehicles, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated; and no warrants shall issue but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched and the persons or things to be seized, and the crime alleged to have been committed; and any person found guilty of obtaining or issuing warrants through fraud, or of making searches or seizures in violation of this clause, shall be removed and barred from holding any office of trust under the Free States, or any of them, and shall be subject to such further penalties as Congress may provided for by law.


16 No person shall be held to answer for a capital or otherwise infamous crime, unless on a presentment or indictment of a grand jury; nor shall any person be subject for the same offense to be twice put in jeopardy of life or limb; nor shall be compelled, in any criminal case, to be a witness against himself; nor be deprived of life, liberty, or property without due process of law.


17 In all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall enjoy the right to a speedy and public trial, by an impartial jury of the State and district wherein the crime shall have been committed, which district shall have been previously ascertained by law, and to be informed of the nature and cause of the accusation; to be confronted with the witnesses against him; to have compulsory process for obtaining witnesses in his favor; and to have the assistance of counsel for his defense.


18 In suits at common law the right of trial by jury shall be preserved; and no fact tried by a jury, shall be otherwise reexamined in any court of the Free States, than according to the rules of the common law.


19 Excessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted.


Section 10. 1 No state shall enter into any treaty, alliance, or confederation; grant letters of marque and reprisal; coin money; emit Bills of Credit; make anything but gold and silver coin a tender in payment of debts; pass any bill of attainder or ex post facto law, or law impairing the obligation of contracts, or denying or impairing the right of property; or grant any title of nobility or privilege.


2 No state shall lay any imposts or duties on imports or exports.


3 No state shall, without the consent of Congress, keep troops, or ships of war in time of peace, enter into any agreement or compact with another State, or with a foreign power, or engage in war, unless actually invaded, or in such imminent danger as will not admit of delay. But when any river divides or flows through two or more States they may enter into compacts with each other to improve the navigation thereof.





Article II
Section 1. 1 The executive power shall be vested in a President of the Free States of America. He shall hold his office for a term of three years, which shall begin at Noon on the twentieth day of January next following his election. The President shall be elected as follows:


2 Each State shall appoint, in such manner as the Legislature thereof may direct, a number of electors equal to the whole number of Representatives to which the State may be entitled in the Congress; but no Senator or Representative or person holding an office of trust or profit under the Free States shall be appointed an elector.


3 The electors shall meet in their respective States and vote by ballot for President, who shall not be an inhabitant of the same State with themselves; they shall name in their ballots the person voted for as President, and they shall make distinct lists of all persons voted for as President, and of the number of votes for each, which lists they shall sign and certify, and transmit, sealed, to the seat of the government of the Free States, directed to the Chairman of the Senate; the Chairman of the Senate shall, in the presence of the Senate and House of Representatives, open all the certificates, and the votes shall then be counted; the person having the greatest number of votes for President shall be the President, if such number be a majority of the whole number of electors appointed; and if no person have such majority, then from the persons having the highest numbers, not exceeding three, on the list of those voted for as President, the Senate shall choose immediately, by ballot, the President. But in choosing the President the votes shall be taken by States-- the representation from each State having one vote; a quorum for this purpose shall consist of a member or members from two-thirds of the States, and a majority of all the States shall be necessary to a choice.


4 The Congress may determine the time of choosing the electors, and the day on which they shall give their votes; which day shall be the same throughout the Free States.


5 No person except a natural-born citizen of the Free States, or a citizen thereof at the time of the adoption of this Constitution, shall be eligible to the office of President; neither shall any person be eligible to that office who shall not have attained to the age of thirty five years, and been fourteen years a resident within the limits of the Free States, as they may exist at the time of this election; and no person shall be eligible to serve as President for more than three years out of every six.


6 In case of the removal of the President from office, or of his death, resignation, or inability to discharge the powers and duties of the said office, the same shall devolve on the Chairman of the Senate, and the Congress may, by law, provide for the case of removal, death, resignation or inability, both of the President and Chairman of the Senate, declaring what officer shall then act as President, and such officer shall act accordingly until the disability be removed or a President shall be elected.


7 The President shall, at stated times, receive for his services a compensation, which shall neither be increased nor diminished during the period for which he shall have been elected; and he shall not receive within that period any other emolument from the Free States, or any of them.


8 Before he enter on the execution of his office he shall take the following oath or affirmation: "I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will faithfully execute the office of President of the Free States of America, and will, to the best of my ability, preserve, protect, defend and obey the Constitution thereof."


Section 2. 1 The President shall be Commander-in-Chief of the militia of the several States when called into the actual defense of the Free States, but he shall not direct any action unless authorized by a declaration of war by the Congress, or in cases of actual invasion or attack on the Free States, when the Congress is not is session; he may require the opinion, in writing, of the principal officer in each of the executive departments, upon any subject relating to the duties of their respective offices.


2 He shall have power, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, to make treaties, provided two-thirds of the States concur; and provided further that no treaty shall reduce, inhibit, infringe or impair the Rights and Immunities of citizens of the Free States, nor shall any treaty confer any powers, duties or responsiblities to the Free States which have not been specifically delegated to them by this Constitution.


3 He shall nominate, and by and with the advice and consent of the Senate shall appoint ambassadors, other public ministers and consuls, justices of the Supreme Court, and all other officers of the Free States whose appointments are not herein otherwise provided for, and which shall be established by law; but the Congress may, by law, vest the appointment of such inferior officers, as they think proper, in the President alone, in the courts of law, or in the heads of departments.


4 The principal officer in each of the Executive Departments, and all persons connected with the diplomatic service, may be removed from office at the pleasure of the President. All other civil officers of the Executive Departments may be removed at any time by the President, or other appointing power, when their services are unnecessary, or for dishonesty, incapacity, inefficiency, misconduct, or neglect of duty; and when so removed, the removal shall be reported to the Senate, together with the reasons therefore.


5 The President shall have power to fill all vacancies that may happen during the recess of the Senate, by granting commissions that shall expire at the end of their next session; but no person rejected by the Senate shall be re-appointed to the same office during their ensuing recess.


Section 3. The President shall from time to time give to the Congress information of the state of the Confederacy, and recommend to their consideration such measures as he shall judge necessary and expedient, within the powers delegated by this Constitution; he may, on extraordinary occasions, convene both Houses, or either of them; and in case of disagreement between them, with respect to the time of adjournment, he may adjourn them until their next regular session; he shall receive ambassadors and other public ministers; he shall take care that the laws be faithfully executed, and shall commission all the officers of the Free States.


Section 4. The President, and all civil and military officers of the Free States, shall be removed from office on impeachment for and conviction of treason, bribery, or other high crimes and misdemeanors.





Article III
Section 1. The judicial power of the Free States shall be vested in one Supreme Court, consisting of a Chief Justice and one associate Justice from each of the several States, and in such inferior courts as the Congress may, from time to time, ordain and establish. The Justices of the Supreme Court shall hold their office for terms of twelve years, and shall not succeed themselves; immediately after they shall be assembled in consequence of the first appointment they shall be divided as equally as may be into three classes. The seats of the Justices of the first class shall be vacated at the expiration of the fourth year, of the second class at the expiration of the eighth year, and the third class at the expiration of the twelfth year, so that one-third may be chosen every fourth year. The judges of the inferior courts shall serve such terms as may be provided by Congress. The judges, both of the Supreme and inferior courts shall, at stated times, receive for their services, a compensation, which shall not be diminished during their continuance in office.


Section 2. 1 The judicial power shall extend to all cases arising under this Constitution, the laws of the Free States, and treaties made, or which shall be made, under their authority; to all cases affecting ambassadors, other public ministers and consuls; to all cases of admiralty and maritime jurisdiction; to controversies to which the Free States shall be a party; to controversies between two or more States; between a State and citizens of another State; between citizens claiming lands under grants of different States; and between a State or the citizens thereof, and foreign states, citizens or subjects; but no State shall be sued by a citizen or subject of any foreign state.


2 In all cases affecting ambassadors, other public ministers and consuls, and those in which a State shall be party, the Supreme Court shall have original jurisdiction. In all the other cases before mentioned, the Supreme Court shall have appellate jurisdiction, both as to law and fact, with such exceptions and under such regulations as the Congress shall make.


3 The trial of all crimes (except in cases of impeachments, and cases arising in the militia when on actual service, in time of war or public danger) shall be by an impartial jury of freeholders of the district, with the requisite of unanimity for conviction, of the right of challenge, and other accustomed requisites, and all juries retain the ancient right of nullification of the law; and in all crimes punishable with loss of life or member, presentment or indictment by a grand jury shall be an essential preliminary, provided that in cases of crimes committed within any county which may be in possession of an enemy, or in which a general insurrection may prevail, the trial may by law be authorized in some other county of the same State, as near as may be to the seat of the offence.




4 In cases of crimes committed not within any county, the trial may by law be in such county as the laws shall have prescribed. In suits at common law the trial by jury, as one of the best securities to the rights of the people, shall remain inviolate.


Section 3. 1 Treason against the Free States, shall consist only in levying war against them, or in adhering to their enemies, giving them aid and comfort. No person shall be convicted of treason unless on the testimony of two witnesses to the same overt act, or on confession in open court.


2 The Congress shall have power to declare the punishment of treason; but no attainder of treason shall work corruption of blood, or forfeiture, except during the life of the person attainted.





Article IV
Section 1. Full faith and credit shall be given in each State to the public acts, records, and judicial proceedings of every other State; and the Congress may, by general laws, prescribe the manner in which such acts, records, and proceedings shall be proved, and the effect thereof.


Section 2. 1 The citizens of each State shall be entitled to all privileges and immunities of citizens in the several States; and shall have the right of transit and sojourn in any State of this Confederacy, with their property; and the right of property shall not be thereby impaired.


2 A person charged in any State with treason, felony, or other crime against the laws of such State, who shall flee from justice, and be found in another State, shall, on demand of the executive authority of the State from which he fled, be delivered up, to be removed to the State having jurisdiction of the crime.


Section 3. 1 Other States may be admitted into this Confederacy by a vote of two-thirds of the whole House of Representatives and two-thirds of the Senate, the Senate voting by States; but no new States shall be formed or erected within the jurisdiction of any other State, nor any State be formed by the junction of two or more States, or parts of States, without the consent of the Legislatures of the States concerned, as well as of the Congress.


2 The Congress shall have power to dispose of and make all needful rules and regulations concerning the property of the Free States, including the lands thereof.


3 The Free States may acquire new territory; and Congress shall have power to legislate and provide governments for the inhabitants of all territory belonging to the Free States, lying without the limits of the several States; and may permit them, at such times, and in such manner as it may by law provide, to form States to be admitted into the Confederacy.


4 The Free States shall guarantee to every State that now is, or hereafter may become, a member of this Confederacy, a republican form of government; and shall protect each of them against invasion; and on application of the Legislature (or of the Executive when the Legislature is not in session) against domestic violence.


5 The people of each State entering into this Confederacy retain the sovereign right to secede therefrom, according to such manner as they may provide in their state constitution. Any property of the Free States, and the lands thereof, within the territory of a State shall revert to the control and ownership of that State upon an Act of Succession.





Article V
Upon the demand of any one-third of the States, legally assembled in their several conventions, the Congress shall summon a convention of all the States, to take into consideration such amendments to the Constitution as the said States shall concur in suggesting at the time when the said demand is made; and should any of the proposed amendments to the Constitution be agreed on by the said convention-- voting by States-- and the same be ratified by the Legislatures of two-thirds of the several States, or by conventions in two-thirds thereof-- as the one or the other mode of ratification may be proposed by the general convention-- they shall thenceforward form a part of this Constitution. But no State shall be deprived of its equal representation in the Senate.





Article VI
1 This Constitution shall be the supreme Law of the land; and the judges in every State shall be bound thereby, anything in the constitution or laws of any State to the contrary notwithstanding.


2 The Senators and Representatives before mentioned, and the members of the several State Legislatures, and all executive and judicial officers, both of the Free States and of the several States, shall be bound by oath or affirmation to support this Constitution; but no religious test shall ever be required as a qualification to any office or public trust under the Free States.


3 The enumeration, in the Constitution, of certain rights shall not be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people of the several States.





Article VII
1 The powers delegated by this Constitution are appropriated to the departments to which they are respectively distributed: so that the Legislative Department shall never exercise the powers vested in the Executive or Judicial, nor the Executive exercise the powers vested in the Legislative or Judicial, nor the Judicial exercise the powers vested in the Legislative or Executive Departments.



2 The powers not delegated by this Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively.


3 The people of each State retain the right to adopt ordinances of nullification on any law of Congress, or act of the Executive, or decision of the Federal Courts, that violates the terms of this Constitution.





Article VIII
1 The ratification of the conventions of any two or more States shall be sufficient for the establishment of this Constitution between the States so ratifying the same.


2 Every State entering into this Confederation shall ask the Electors of that State to ratify this Constitution at least once in every ten years.



Dunrobin writes: "I've grown dubious in recent years as to whether it is possible to keep government reined in. (I've gone from conservative Republican to Libertarian to anarchist.) In my more optimistic/idealistic moods, however, I've tried my hand at improving upon the current Constitution of 1787. I still tweak it once in a while, as some new outrage appears in the news.

I started off by building on the Constitution of the Confederate States of America, written in 1861. Many Americans probably have no idea that the Confederate Constitution was virtually a carbon copy of the original U.S. Constitution of 1787 - with a few tweaks. They blended in the Bill of Rights, and made a few major improvements, such as the Presidential "Line Item" veto, and some restrictions on Federal legislation. Admittedly, they did include provisions to preserve slavery (although they specifically banned the importation of any new slaves), but those provisions have been replaced with a specific prohibition of all forms of slavery

From there I reviewed James Madison's original proposals to the 1st Congress, which eventually became the Bill of Rights. Mr. Madison actually made a number of very sensible suggestions beyond those that appear in the Bill of Rights, which I blended in as he proposed. I also incorporated a few of the proposals made by the Hartford Convention in 1814, and I added in the "Original Thirteeth Amendment" as well. After that I just started tweaking left and right, doing my best to close all of the remaining loopholes I could find.

I decided to post this here to see what kind of reactions this proposal gets. I'm looking forward to others picking holes in it, as I'm sure that I've missed plenty of them. It will be interesting to see if we can come up with a realistic proposal that would have a better shot at preserving liberty longer than the 1787 Constitution managed."

pokerkid
Site Admin
Posts: 7781

another group with similar thinking

Post#2 » Wed Jun 29, 2005 8:45 pm

http://www.federationofstates.org

THE CONSTITUTION OF THE SOUTHERN
INDEPENDENCE PARTY
(Party Charter)

JULY 4, 2000

Certified May12, 2001 by the Delegates to the National Convention of the Southern Independence Party
Ratified September 4, 2001 unanimously by six (6) States Replying Timely

PREAMBLE

We, the People of the Southern States, with each State acting in its sovereign and
independent character, in order to form a political compact between the Southern Independence Parties of the several States whose People are committed to Biblical Christian principals, limited government, State's rights and free trade in the furtherance of the Asheville Declaration and in accordance with the will and well being of the Southern people, and invoking the favour and guidance of Almighty God, do hereby ordain and establish this constitution of the Southern Independence Party

PRELUDE

THE FEDERATION OF STATES INTRODUCING THE
CONSTITUTION OF THE SOUTHERN INDEPENDENCE PARTY

Ladies and Gentlemen of the Congress of the Southern Independence Party's State Delegates:

Dennis Joyce, Executive Trustee of the Federation of States introduces a Constitution which has evolved after reviewing portions of the January 7, 2000 Constitution which had been prepared by the hard work of several dedicated Southerners and was finalized by them on December 15, 1999. Notably contributing were George Kalas, Michael Hill, Joel L. Watts, Greg Kay, Thomas Rhyne Brown, Dr. Thomas Hiter, Ph.D., Charles Smith and several others of great importance who were supporting this effort behind the scenes and including Mike Crane who wrote much of the document.

As this movement has grown and taken in members from many new States, growing pains have been experienced as would be expected. Political organizations go through a natural metamorphism similar to organic cells as they grow and mature. The needs and modes of operations also change, as they must, to meet the maturing challenges and yet must retain their initial seedling fundamentals and ideals. Thus it has been in the Southern Independence Party and thus it shall continue.

Foremost among these seedling ideals are the ideas of our freedoms and rights being protected by a Federation of neighbors and States of like mind thus offering each other a degree of liberty along with certain securities of person, family as well as other rights of Life, Liberty and the Freedom for the Pursuit of Happiness, the right of Contract and to Possess Property, Freedom of Religion, Expression, Speech and of the Press and of the right of the people to peacefully Assemble and to Petition the Government for the Redress of Grievances, the Freedom to Keep and Bear Arms including the right to establish State and Private Militias, and to end most of our international treaties, and to end the centralist federal control and policies over us and to free ourselves from federal personal income tax.

To best secure the rights above mentioned, two main principles shown below are involved. The identified opposition to these principles are shown as well which are involved in the eternal struggle for personal freedoms and local government. We must hold to the principles of freedom in order to accomplish the main goal of the restoration of the free government of the Confederate States of America. A free Confederate States government benefitting all southern people would become a standard to hold up to the people of the world.

1. "STATES' RIGHTS AND INDIVIDUAL SOVEREIGNTY vs

Centralist Dictatorial Control from the Top Down by the New World Order."

2. "SECESSION AND INDEPENDENCE FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES vs

Continued Occupation and Suppression by the United States."

3. "RESTORATION OF FREE AND SOVEREIGN GOVERNMENTS OF EACH OF THE CONFEDERATE STATES OF AMERICA"

CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTIONS

To secure these rights, then, we, the undersigned, after the close of a Special Caucus of the elected Executive Committee of the Southern Party of Texas which was held in Bryan, Texas, met in the capacity of a Constitutional Convention on May 6, 2000 in order to review, incorporate and improve upon the January 7, 2000 Constitution in order to secure a more perfect Federation Involved in this meeting were Dennis Joyce, Carol Edwards, John David Poole II, Vance J. Beaudreau and Robert Baker.

Finally, after a draft of this Constitution was distributed and comments and suggestions were obtained, the present comprehensive Constitution was finalized, and after editing for clerical errors, was unanimously approved and submitted to a larger Constitutional Convention of July 4, 2000 with such State leaders as were involved becoming Trustees of a Trust Indenture called the Federation of States and who received authority from the Trust Creator/Trustor for the management of the Trust Indenture and for the acceptance, adoption and protection of the Constitution of the Southern Independence Party.

It was a primary purpose of this larger Constitutional Convention of July 4, 2000 to construct a contract (charter) in the form of a common law trust which would serve as the umbrella (national) organization for the Constitution of the Southern Independence Party. It was a fundamental consideration of this Convention that a party Constitution would be likely to set the pattern for a later construction of a Constitution for a nation made up of a Federation of Free States and therefore much emphasis was placed on individual freedoms and the Sovereignty of the various States' Parties while arranging for the loan of enough Sovereignty from these States' Parties so that a cohesive and effective national Federation could be effected without too much erosion of authority and rights from the States' Parties. In other words, the constructed Constitution is designed to avoid unchecked top down centralist control leaving most of the control and authority at the State level and with the individual members of the party. It was the secondary purpose of this July 4, 2000 Constitutional Convention to adopt the Constitution of the Southern Independence Party.

The Trustees of this common law trust called Federation of States shall serve as a Board of Trustees for the management of the Trust Indenture and for the acceptance and protection of the Constitution of the Southern Independence Party. This Board of Trustees is and shall be made up of State Chairman of the Southern Independence Party who shall oversee the functioning of the Trust for the purpose of providing a Federation of States of Southern Independence Parties and a limited government thereof called "The Southern Independence Party." But, it shall not be a purpose of the Federation of States to run or control the The Southern Independent Party which shall be run by the various State Parties belonging and pledging loyalty thereto.

The Board of Trustees of The Federation of States shall hold a National Convention for the Southern Independence Party in Birmingham, Alabama on July 28 and July 29, 2000 for introduction of the plan and the proposed Constitution for the Southern Independence Party. The formal Adoption of this Constitution shall occur on May 11, 2001 by the Trustees (State Chairmen) of the Federation of States. Certification of the Adopted Constitution by the Southern Independence Party Provisional Congress (two Delegates from each State Southern Independence Party for the Ratification process by the various State Southern Independence Parties' Executive Committees or County Delegates who shall formally notify the Executive Director of the Federation of States of the ratification results.

Respectfully submitted for the South,
Board of Trustees of The Federation of States
For the Southern Independence Party

CONTENTS

THE CONSTITUTION OF

THE SOUTHERN INDEPENDENCE PARTY

PREAMBLE

PRELUDE

INDEX

ARTICLE I. PRINCIPLES, GOALS, AND CODE OF CONDUCT

OF THE SOUTHERN INDEPENDENCE PARTY

SECTION 1: Southern Independence Party Principles

SECTION 2: Southern Independence Party Goal

SECTION 3: Code of Conduct

ARTICLE II. PARTY LEGAL ORGANIZATION

SECTION 1: Southern Independence Party Chartered in Oklahoma

SECTION 2: Chairman of the Southern Independence Party

SECTION 3: National Level Sergeant at Arms

SECTION 4: Congressional and Recall Sergeant at Arms

SECTION 5: Oath of Office for the Party Chairman of the Southern

Independence Party

SECTION 6: Federation of States

ARTICLE III. NATIONAL OPERATIONS

SECTION 1: Southern Independence Party Congress

SECTION 2: Southern Executive Branch (SEB)

SECTION 3: Oath of Office

SECTION 4: Eligibility for Congressional Voting

SECTION 5: Congressional Voting Procedures

SECTION 6: National Level Political Alliances

ARTICLE IV. FORMATION OF STATE PARTIES

SECTION 1: States to Organize Southern Independence Parties

SECTION 2: The Appointment of Provisional Chairmen

ARTICLE V. STATE SOUTHERN PARTIES

SECTION 1: Sovereignty Clause

SECTION 2: Officers

SECTION 3: Endorsement of State Candidates and Platforms

SECTION 4: Membership.

ARTICLE VI. POWERS LOANED TO THE NATIONAL LEVEL

SECTION 1: Affiliation, Disaffiliation, Re-Affiliation of State Parties

SECTION 2: Minimum Annual National Budget

SECTION 3: National Funds

SECTION 4: General Platform

SECTION 5: Public Relations

ARTICLE VII. LEGITIMACY OF AND MEANS TO ENACT BY-LAWS

SECTION 1: By-Laws

SECTION 2: Means to Enact

ARTICLE VIII. ADOPTION, CERTIFICATION, RATIFICATION AND

NOTIFICATION OF

THE SOUTHERN INDEPENDENCE PARTY CONSTITUTION

SECTION 1: Adoption and Certification

SECTION 2: Ratification

SECTION 3: Notification

ARTICLE IX. AMENDMENTS TO

THE SOUTHERN INDEPENDENCE PARTY CONSTITUTION

SECTION 1: Submission and Certification

SECTION 2: Ratification

SECTION 3: Notification

ARTICLE X. RECALL OF NATIONAL OFFICERS OF

THE SOUTHERN INDEPENDENCE PARTY

SECTION 1: Bill of Notice of Recall Convention

SECTION 2: Recall

SECTION 3: Impeachment

SECTION 4: Prosecution for Civil Fraud and/or

Breach of Contract of Oath of Office or of Fiduciary Duty

SECTION 4: The Sergeant at Arms

ARTICLE XI. DEFINITIONS OF WORDS [To be prepared later]

ARTICLE I.

PRINCIPLES, GOALS, AND CODE OF CONDUCT

OF THE SOUTHERN INDEPENDENCE PARTY

SECTION 1: Southern Independence Party Principles

Paragraph 1. These are the Principles of the Southern Independence Party.

We, the officers and members of the Southern Independence Party, in accordance with the ideals of our Revolutionary and Confederate ancestors, dedicate ourselves to the following:

The Bill of Rights and the Spirit of the lawful Constitution of these united States of America, and the spirit of the lawful Constitution of the Confederate States of America, as established by our forefathers:

The right of each sovereign State to control its own internal affairs within the bounds directly expressed in the Constitution for these united States without interference from the federal government.

The sanctity of human life, from conception to natural death.

The right to be absolutely secure in person, papers, and property from government search, seizure, or other interference, within the expressed bounds of the Constitution for these united States.

The right of the individual citizen to keep and bear arms and ammunition is absolute not requiring license, permit nor subject to any other governmental restrictions. Individual citizens may keep and bear arms as may seem to them necessary for the defense of person, property or State from dangers or depredations either foreign or domestic.

The right of the individual to be free from confiscatory federal income tax and fees.

The right of the sovereign States to be free of federal mandates on issues internal to the several States.

The right to demand honesty and integrity in government shall be emphasized. Funding of State or federal politicians, bureaucrats and/or governmental agencies by foreign governments or rulers shall be prohibited. Likewise, the funding of such entities by corporations, labor unions or insurance and banking interests, foreign or domestic, shall also be prohibited.

The righteousness of the Cause of our Revolutionary and Confederate ancestors, in resisting tyranny and subsequent invasion, and the right to display their symbols when and where the people of the sovereign States see fit. Indeed, the rights of all races and cultures to cherish and respect their roots and heritage shall be upheld.

Art. I.

The right to worship Almighty God in the manner that the individual citizen sees fit, and to conduct that worship, with its associated symbols and ceremonies, when, where, and how it seems to them right, individually or as a group, while affording others a similar right.

The right to expect no interference with religious beliefs, symbols and practices by government so long as the rights of others are not being violated.

These rights, we the officers and members of the Southern Independence Party, do and will uphold with our hearts, minds, and bodies; and into the hands of the living God we place our lives, our liberty, and our honor, as individuals, as sovereign States, and as a nation, and we pray for His mercy, guidance, and strengthening power. Here we stand, and may God defend our rights and preserve our freedom.

SECTION 2: Southern Independence Party Goal

Paragraph 1. The Goal of the Southern Independence Party (SIP) is complete independence, liberty and freedom for the Southern People from these united States of America by having the legislatures of the various Southern States involved vote a Bill of Re-Affirmation of their Statehood in the Confederate States of America followed by Bills of Liberation and Termination of Occupation by the United States of America preceded in those States where still needed by legal political secession.

Paragraph 2. We recognize that self-determination through democratic elections is in accordance with our principles of sovereignty. We also recognize that the Confederate States of America never surrendered and thus has not legally ceased to exist, but is simply dormant awaiting Re-Affirmation of Statehood by the previous States belonging thereto and the provisional staffing of National offices and elections thereto. We do not recognize the involuntary re-establishment of Statehood in the United States which was accomplished with military force applied by the occupying foreign army of the United States against the will of the people. We do recognize the reality of the rule by force through these various Southern Satellite States created by the United States as mock State governments of the people of those States and we intend to abide peacefully in the State Election Laws therein. We have no designs of overthrowing the United States Government, but of simply regaining our independence as a Southern Nation.

Paragraph 3. The Southern Independence Party shall endeavor to encourage its affiliated (federated) State Parties to run candidates for office for Governor and the Legislature of their State as well as other State and local offices they might choose to try to elect.

Paragraph 4. The Southern Independence Party shall lay plans for the eventual candidacy of persons for office in a National Legislature (Senate and House of Representatives) and for a President of The Confederate States of America when eight (8) States shall have legally Re-affirmed their Statehood in the Confederate States of America who have already (in 1860-61) seceded from the United States.

Art. I.

Paragraph 5. The Southern Independence Party shall establish committees to study plans that might be put into effect in the event of political Renewal of Statehood in the Confederate States of America for the establishment of good and peaceful international relations and economic ties with the United States, Mexico and other foreign nations with responsible disengagement from treaties and debts with proper arrangement for the satisfaction thereof, including the South's portion of the national debt now existing so that the good people of the other states of the United States need not unfairly suffer as a result of our independence.

SECTION 3: Code of Conduct

Paragraph 1. All Southern Independence Party officers shall at all times publicly conduct themselves as befits Southern ladies and gentlemen, as according to their signed oath of office and in accordance with the Constitution, By-Laws, committee rules, and the established Code of Conduct of the Southern Independence Party.

Paragraph 2. The Code of Conduct shall be given complete legitimacy by this Constitution and shall be recognized by both Houses of the Southern Independence Party Congress, the Southern Executive Branch and by the State Southern parties. The Code of Conduct and the By-Laws shall stand separate from the Constitution as supporting documents to this Constitution.

Paragraph 3. Upon ratification of this Constitution, a committee shall be selected by the Southern Independence Party Congress from a list of names submitted by the several States to write a Code of Conduct. The Committee shall be limited to a total of five (5) committee members, selected from the several State parties , one (1) committee member selected from the Southern Independence Party Congress, and several advisors, the number of whom to be determined by the Committee Chairman, to serve in a non-voting capacity.

Art. II.

ARTICLE II. PARTY LEGAL ORGANIZATION

SECTION 1: Southern Independence Party Chartered by its Constitution held by the Federation of States Trust.

The Southern Independence Party is Chartered by the Trustees of the Federation of States domiciled in Atoka, Oklahoma, Confederate States of America under the control and occupation of the United States of America.

SECTION 2: Chairman of the Southern Independence Party

(Party Chairman)

Paragraph 1. The National Chairman of the Southern Independence Party shall be elected by a 51% majority vote of the Congress (joint session of the Senate and House of Representatives) of the Southern Independence Party meeting in a National Convention in Birmingham, Alabama on July 29, 2000 to serve a term of office of one (1) year and may be re-elected for a second term in succession. The Chairman of the Southern Independence Party must be a registered voter who is a member of the Southern Independence Party who shall not participate in any other political party during the year of his term of office.

Paragraph 2. The National Chairman of the Southern Independence Party shall be the chief and legal executive officer of the party, but shall serve with limited authority. The National Party Chairman of the Southern Independence Party shall not have authority over the normal operations and meetings of Congress except when the Chairman of the Southern Independence Party is presiding as Chair over a meeting or open convention of the entire Southern Independence Party in which case the Party Chairman shall preside and administer the convention under Robert's rules of Order, 9th Edition.

Paragraph 3. The National Chairman of the Southern Independence Party shall have overall administrative authority which shall normally be largely delegated to the Executive Director of the Southern Executive Branch (SEB), except for the presiding responsibilities as Chair to the entire Southern Independence Party and for those responsibilities involving solely legalities and reports in and for the various State PACs.

Paragraph 4. During a vacancy of the office of Executive Director, the National Chairman of the Southern Independence Party shall function as the Temporary Executive Director of the SEB. The Chairman of the Southern Independence Party also shall appoint persons to fill the various offices of the Southern Executive Branch (SEB) with the recommendations of the Executive Director. The appointed persons, including the Executive Director, for the various offices of the SEB must have their appointments approved by a 51% majority vote of the Senate prior to serving on the SEB.

Paragraph 5. The National Chairman of the Southern Independence Party (Party Chairman) shall be

sworn in by the Chief Justice of the Constitutional Court and shall sign an oath of office. The Party Chairman

Art. II.

may not be removed by Congress except by Impeachment with a two thirds (2/3rds) vote as specified in Article X.

SECTION 3: National Level Sergeant at Arms

A National Sergeant at Arms shall be appointed by the Chairman of the Southern Independence Party who may be a paid professional security guard or law enforcement officer. The National Sergeant at Arms shall maintain order according to the Code of Conduct and under the direction of the Chairman of the Southern Independence Party during any convention or meeting of the Southern Independence Party.

SECTION 4: Congressional and Recall Sergeant at Arms

The Sergeant at Arms of Congress (both one for the Senate and another for the House) shall cooperate with the National Sergeant of Arms and serve under his direction when he is present. A recall Sergeant of Arms, however, shall temporarily preside as the security officer in charge during a recall procedure.

SECTION 5: Oath of Office for the Party Chairman of the Southern Independence Party

Paragraph 1. The following shall be the Oath of Office. It shall be signed and submitted according to the guidelines set forth in this Document shall be sworn to by the Party Chairman elect and administered by the Chief Justice of the Constitutional Court.

I_ have read, fully understand and ascribe to the officially stated goals and principles of the Southern Independence Party as outlined in this Constitution, and within the platform of the Southern Independence Party.

By my signature, I hereby affirm and pledge to work to further the goals and platform of the Southern Independence Party. I realize that if I fail to uphold these principles or found to have willfully violated the Constitution of the Southern Independence Party or By-Laws thereof, I may be impeached from my Southern Independence Party office and agree to immediately legally resign as Chairman of the Southern Independence Party should that occur.

Chairman of the Southern Independence Party President of the Senate

Chief Justice of the Constitutional Court

Art. II.

SECTION 6: Federation of States

Paragraph 1. The Federation of States is a separate organization which, by its nature, mission and composition, make it a fully affiliated partner of the Southern Independence Party and which was established on July 4, 2000 in Atoka, Oklahoma, as a common law trust composed of the federated State Chairmen (or Governors) of the Southern Independence Parties of the various States affiliated therewith. Each such federated State Chairman (or Governor) shall have one vote on the Board of Trustees of the Federation of States and shall serve as a council of Chairmen or Governors or perhaps both initially and until all States have Governors who have federated therein.

Paragraph 2. Only elected or provisional State Chairman (or later SIP elected Governors) are to be voting members. The various State Chairmen of such State Southern Parties are bound together under a written contract (Oath of honor) whereby they become Trustees or voting participants of such a council of Governors (State Chairmen). The coordinating value of such a council and the value as a think-tank group is obvious. Still, the agreements or plans made by such a council of Chairmen (Governors) is not binding upon the various State Parties until they assent thereto by vote of their respective State Party organizations or Legislatures in the case of Governors.

Paragraph 3. These State Chairmen or Governors (Trustees of the Federation of States) shall elect an Executive Trustee called Chairman of the Federation of States to preside from time to time by simple majority vote. In some ways the Federation shall function similar to councils of Governors currently existing for the Republican and for the Democratic Parties.

Paragraph 4. The Federation of States shall serve as a Chartering organization not requiring a corporate charter nor the approval of the Federal Election Commission to charter States under the Constitution of the Southern Independence Party which will work to get local and State officials elected who support the goals of the Restoration of the Confederate States of America and the Liberation of our Southern States from Occupation by the United States. The Chartering of certain States will be particularly helpful where their State law requires a large number of members to be enlisted first before being allowed to register as a political party. As a Chartered organization, the people of those States can function legally up until they have grown large enough to registered with their State as a Political Party.

Paragraph 5. After (6 or 8) States establish initial SIP organizations which are ready to move forward the Federation of States shall convene in a national organizational convention to establish the national Southern Independence Party.

Paragraph 6. Once the national SIP is established, the overseeing coordination of the various Chartered SIP States by the Federation of States becomes greatly diminished since most coordination as well as party administration shall be conducted by the national Southern Independence Party itself.

Art. II.

Paragraph 7. Summary. The Federation of States (Council of State Chairmen or Governors)

shall:

(1) Serve as a State Chairmans' or Governors' think tank organization which will work to effect some coordination of effort among the States as well as to plan for a peaceful negotiated separation from the USA. The Federation of States, as a separate organization, shall not be subject to the control of the national Southern Independence Party, but shall function in cooperation with the Southern Independence Party in a specifically limited way as defined in this Constitution of the Southern Independence Party.

(2) Study and offer amendments proposals on the Constitution of the Southern Independence Party (SIP Constitution) as seems prudent to the various State Chairmen which would be introduced in the Congress of the national Southern Independence Party for the amendment process.

(3) Work to introduce the Southern Independence Party (SIP) to the various unorganized Southern States and promote the SIP Constitution as an interim organizing multi-State document designed to not only provide order without centralization of control or sacrificing State's rights and sovereignty to assist in the conversion of the occupied States to free States and later to Liberated States offering their allegiance to the Confederate States of America. Of course, once the Confederate States of America is restored as a functioning government, an amended CSA Constitution of 1861 shall be presented to the States for Ratification according law.

(4) Charter new Provisional (SIP) party officers in new developmental States prior to a State caucus election and provide advice and, if requested, some assistance in their efforts.

(5) To assist and/or coordinate multi-State rallies needed to promote the Political/Governmental, Cultural/Heritage and/or Religious Faith and Freedom Heritage efforts.

(6) Hear and attempt to arbitrate complaints unofficially from other State SIP Chairmen or Governors concerning misunderstandings or wrongful acts by a particular State party and perhaps resolve the problems without going public with them and hopefully avoiding a split.

(7) Organizing Body. Arrange for a National Convention to introduce the Southern Independence Party (SIP) to two delegates from each involved State in order to form the national Southern Independence Party once six (6) or more States are Chartered and ready.

(8) Constitutional Court. The Federation of States shall serve as the electing body who will elect from among their own members (State Chairmen or Governors) a panel, not to exceed nine judges for the Constitutional Court who shall then safeguard the SIP Constitution and have jurisdiction over constitutional definitions, questions and meanings within the Federation of States and the national Southern Independence Party.

Art. II.

Such elected judges shall only serve as long as they are a State Governor (or SIP Chairman in the absence of a member Governor).

(9) Transition. The Federation of States shall serve as a coordinating and transitional planning body assisting the various Liberated or Seceding States and presents a provisional government during the interim between a general Liberation movement by nine (9) or more States and the formal Restoration of the Confederate States of America by their appointment of a Provisional President of the Confederacy and the formation of Provisional Representatives to the two Houses of Congress of the Confederate States of America.

(10) Elections. The Constitutional Court of the Federation of States shall serve as the coordinating body for the timing of State Elections to replace the national Provisional officers of the Confederate States of America. The Chief Justice of the Constitutional Court shall provide the function of swearing in and signing oaths of contract for office by the elected officials of the CSA.

(11) Confederate Security Council. To serve as a Board of Advisors to the President of the Confederate States of America instead of an ambiguous and non-elected nor constitutionally mandated National Security Council. In other words, the Council of State Governors would serve as the Board of Advisors to the President of the Confederacy.

(12) Additional Check and Balance against Executive usurpation of authority. To serve as an additional and new group empowered to initiate Impeachment Proceedings against a President of the Confederacy or Judge on the CSA Supreme Court (in addition to the CSA House of Representatives as now provided). Such Impeachment Proceedings would still have to be finalized by the CSA Senate.

Art. III.

ARTICLE III.

NATIONAL OPERATIONS

SECTION 1: SOUTHERN INDEPENDENCE PARTY CONGRESS

Paragraph 1. Legislative Branch. The legislative body of the Southern Independence Party will be the Southern Independence Party Congress, which shall be composed of two separate houses, a Senate and a House of Representatives.

Paragraph 2. There shall be a Senate made up of two Senators from each of the Federated and affiliated State Southern Independence Parties. Each State party will determine their method of selecting their representatives to the National Senate.

(1) The Senate shall elect from among their members, a President of the Senate to preside over the Senate for a term of one year with a 51% majority vote of the Senators. Removal of the President of the Senate prior to the expiration of his term of office shall require a 2/3rds vote of the Senators. The President of the Senate shall preside over meetings of the Senate under Robert's rules of Order, 9th Edition. The Senate shall approve appointment of a Secretary by the Senate President.

(2) In addition to the joint sessions of the Congress, the Senate shall meet at least once a year alone and more often as required. Special meetings may be held by E-mail.

(3) In the absence of the President of the Senate, the Chairman of the Southern Independence Party may preside or appoint a Senator as Temporary Chairman of the Senate.

(4) Special meetings of the Senate may be called by the President of the Senate or by three Senators.

Paragraph 3. And, there shall be a House of Representatives, made up of elected representatives called Congressmen, allowed for their State based upon population census. (See the table shown below). Or, in other words, eventually it shall be desirable that there be one Congressman authorized for each 100,000 voting age citizens, more or less, divided up into districts strictly drawn up only by the States in question and not tampered with by the Federation of States, nor by Constitutional Court Judges. Only if State lines (borders) were being adjusted between States would this involve the Federation of States (Council of State Party Chairmen or State Governors or a mixture of both where a Federation Governor has not been elected).

(1) The House of Representatives shall elect from among their members a Speaker of the House who shall serve one year terms of office. The Speaker of the House shall preside over meetings of the House of Representatives under Robert's Rules of Order, 9th Edition and the term of the Speaker shall be one year. In the Speaker's absence or for a special meeting which the Speaker will not call, then by the request of three (3) States acting through their two

Art. III.

Congressmen for a total of at least six (6) Congressmen of the currently serving State Representatives to the Congress or by the Executive Director of the SEB if concurred in by three State Chairmen a special or emergency meeting may be held of the House of Representatives and, in the case of the absence of or lack of cooperation by the Speaker of the House, the States requesting the special or emergency meeting may elect a Temporary Chairman to conduct said meeting. Such special meetings may be held by E-mail with procedures proscribed in the By-Laws of the House of Representatives.

(2) State Party organization shall proceed by first establishing a Provisional Chairman in a new State, which shall be accomplished by the Chairman of the Federation of States but whose appointment must be approved by a 51% vote of the Senate.

a. Provisional State Parties affiliated with the Southern Independence Party shall be represented in the Senate with no more than one Senator unless the chairman of such State shall become a Trustee of the Federation of States, nor in the Congress until they have obtained 10 members. The Chairman of the Federation of States shall appoint a Provisional Chairman to a new State Party. The main job of such an affiliated State party is to recruit and organize sufficient to allow for a statewide caucus in accordance with the election laws of the State involved so that they might officially elect officers.

b. After the election of officers in accordance with the election laws of the State involved, an affiliated State Southern Independence Party shall be allowed one Congressman and one Senator to be elected at their official and legal statewide caucus as Representatives of such affiliated State Southern Independence Party.

c. After the statewide Caucus of such affiliated Party, their elected Chairman becomes eligible for election to the Federation of States Board of Trustees. If such election occurs and the State Chairman involved becomes a Trustee, that State Party shall be deemed to be a Federated State Party of the Southern Independence Party and one additional Senator may be elected to represent such a Federated State Southern Independence Party.

d. Thereafter, legally elected officers of such State Southern Independence Party shall endeavor to build the local membership. For the next 100 new voting members after the first 100 voting members, such State Southern Independence Party shall be entitled to elect an additional Congressman.

e. Then, when such new State Southern Independence Party shall obtain more voting members than 200, the additional new voting members in such States would be applied to the following chart for authorization for additional Congressman.

f. State Southern Independence Parties affiliated with the Southern Independence Party may recall their elected representatives, either to the Senate or to

Art. III.

the House of Representatives from the Southern Independence Party and elect other representatives in their place at any time by procedures of their own State Party Constitution. The Southern Independence Party Congress shall not have the authority to reject any State Certified representative sent in accordance with this Constitution to the Southern Independence Party Congress nor to refuse seating or voting thereof, but may request of a particular State Party that a representative be considered for recall.

g. Congressional Representation Chart

(Each Federated State Party gets two (2) Senators elected by State Executive Committee)

Party Voting Member Size Groupings Number of Congressmen Members

Provisional Chairman, new State Party - = 0 1 or more

After statewide Caucus elects officers - = 1 10 -99

Next 1-499 voting members (VMs) - = 2 100 -499

10 additional groups of 500 (VMs) - = 3-12 500 -5499

10 additional groups of 1000 (VMs) - = 13-22 5500 -15,499

10 additional groups of 2000 (VMs) - = 23-32 15,500 -35,499

10 additional groups of 4000 (VMs) - = 33-42 35,500 -75,499

10 additional groups of 8000 (VMs) - = 43-52 75,500 -155,499

10 additional groups of 16000 (VMs) - = 53-62 155,500 -315,499

10 additional groups of 32000 (VMs) - = 63-72 315,500 -645,499

10 additional groups of 64000 (VMs) - = 73-82 645,500 -1,285,499

10 additional groups of 100000 (VMs) - = 83-92 1,285,500 -2,285,499

10 additional groups of 200000 (VMs) - = 93-102 2,285,500 -4,285,499

10 additional groups of 400000 (VMs) - = 103-112 4,285,500 -8,285,499

10 additional groups of 800000 (VMs) - = 113-122 8,285,500 -16,285,499

10 additional groups of 1000000 (VMs)- = 123-132 16,285,500 -26,285,499

Paragraph 2. Joint Sessions of both houses of Congress. The Southern Independence Party Congress shall meet at least twice a year in open convention of both houses of Congress in joint session. The date of the second open meeting shall be set during the summer annual open convention. The second meeting shall not take place later than a two month period before the next open Convention. Emergency meetings of the Congress may be called by the Speaker of the House and the President of the Senate with notice being sent to all State Chairmen two (2) weeks in advance of the meeting to afford all the opportunity to make arrangements to attend in person and/or prepare for discussion on the matters to be addressed in the emergency meeting.

Art. III.

Paragraph 3. The Chairman of the Southern Independence Party shall preside over the Open National Conventions and combined joint meetings of both Houses of Congress under Robert's Rules of Order, 9th Edition. The Chairman shall call each convention to order, shall preside for the duration of the convention and shall dismiss the Southern Independence Party Congress at the close of each open convention, and shall have the authority to call special emergency conventions throughout the year to handle contingencies.

Paragraph 4. The Southern Independence Party Congress will set the general direction of the Party, formulate the general Platform, and govern on all matters concerning Party business, excluding internal business of the several State Party affiliates, and for such matters to be passed at 51% majority vote of both houses shall be required.

Paragraph 5. To accomplish specific functions enumerated in the Constitution, By-Laws and the Committee Rules, the Southern Independence Party Congress shall elect a Southern Executive Branch in open convention to carry out the policies and procedures established by the Southern Independence Party Congress. A simple majority vote of 51% shall suffice to elect the members of the Southern Executive Branch. Any member of the Southern Executive Branch may be removed from their office by a simple majority (51%) vote of the Southern Independence Party Congress except the Executive Director whose removal shall require at 2/3rds vote of the Southern Independence Party Congress.

Paragraph 6. No member of the Southern Independence Party Congress may concurrently officially serve on the Southern Independence Party Congress and on the Southern Executive Branch, whether elected, appointed, hired or volunteered, and upon such a member's election or assignment to the Southern Executive Branch his or her resignation as a state representative to either the Senate or House of Representatives is implied, stipulated and accepted.

Paragraph 7. For meetings of the Southern Independence Party Congress, a quorum shall be defined as a simple 51% majority of the current members, but all State Chairmen must be given written notification of any such emergency meetings or conventions which may be called.

Paragraph 8. The Southern Independence Party Congress (House of Representatives) shall consist of the following officers:

(1) A Speaker of the House who shall preside during sessions of Congress under Robert's Rules of Order, 9th Edition. The Speaker shall appoint an alternate Speaker to preside during his or her absence.

(2) Special emergency conventions or caucuses of the House of Representatives may also be called by request to the Speaker of the House by three (3) States acting through their two Congressmen for a total of at least six (6) Delegates of the currently serving State Representatives to the Congress or by the Executive Director of the SEB if concurred in by three State Chairmen.

Art. III.

(3) Such special emergency conventions or caucuses may be held by telephone combined with E-mail or Facsimile as may seem be prudent at the time. The Speaker of the House shall have no Southern Independence Party administrative authority other than calling and chairing conventions of the House of Representatives, seeing that the Congressional Rules are observed and in seeing that each member of the Southern Independence Party Congress receives a copy of reports that are received from the SEB Executive Director as well as such reports as may be ordered by the Southern Independence Party Congress to be prepared.

(4) An Audit Committee Chairman shall nominate two Southern Independence Party Congress members for election by the Congress to serve under him as an Audit Committee to audit the books of the Southern Executive Branch including those of the Treasurer, the Director of Finance and the Executive Director of the SEB. The Southern Executive Branch shall furnish the funds to pay for the services of a professional accounting firm working under the Audit Committee's supervision.

(5) An audit shall be made at least once a year for a report to be made to the National Convention. Written reports shall be sent under the direction of the Executive Director of

the Southern Executive Branch to all members of Congress (Senate and House of Representatives), of the Southern Executive Branch (SEB) and to all State Chairmen. A report shall also be made available to the appropriate governmental authorities.

(6) A Secretary to record both the operations of the convention and all decisions reached. The Secretary shall submit a full report of all convention business to the Executive Director of the Southern Executive Branch within one month after the close of the convention.

(7) A Sergeant-at-Arms shall be appointed by the Speaker of the House to maintain order according to the Code of Conduct during the Congressional convention.

Paragraph 9. All elected officers of the Southern Independence Party House of Representatives shall be elected by the Southern Independence Party Congress (Congressional Representatives) at the close of each open convention for a period of one year.

(1) To be eligible to serve as an elected officer of the Southern Independence Party Congress, the nominated person must be a current member of Congress wherein a simple majority 51% of all of the Congressmen shall be required to elect them. Any officer other than the Chairman of the Southern Independence Party or the Speaker of the House, or the Executive Director of the SEB may be removed from office by the Southern Independence Party Congress with a simple majority vote 51% of all of the Congressmen at which time new officers shall be elected by the Southern Independence Party Congress to fill any and all vacancies. Removal of the Speaker of the House prior to expiration of their term of office shall require a 2/3rds vote of the House of Representatives.

(2) Removal of the Party Chairman shall be done in accordance with Article II, Section 2, paragraph 6.

(3) Removal of the Executive Director of the Southern Executive Branch shall be by the Senate in accordance with Article II, Section 2, paragraph 5.

Art. III.

(4) Should the current members of the Southern Independence Party Congress desire to elect an officer of the Southern Independence Party Congress for a third or more consecutive term of one year in the same officer's position, a 2/3rds vote by the current members of the Southern Independence Party Congress shall be required.

Paragraph 10. Members of Congress may speak to the press, but only represent their own opinions or the positions of the State Party they represent. The Speaker of the House may speak to the press of his own opinion and of his workings and or meetings of the House of Representatives, but the Speaker of the House may not necessarily give statements to the press on behalf of the entire Southern Independence Party.

Paragraph 11. Congressional Rules shall be prepared by vote of the Congress for operations of the Southern Executive Branch and a careful log kept of the minutes of the meetings and the motions and voting thereof by the Secretary of the Congress.

Art. III.

SECTION 2: SOUTHERN EXECUTIVE BRANCH (SEB)

Paragraph 1. The Southern Executive Branch (SEB) shall be the administrative and functionary arm (Executive Branch) of the Southern Independence Party. All officers and functionaries of the Southern Executive Branch must be State members of the Southern Independence Party in good standing. The Southern Executive Branch shall have no legislative authority over the Southern Independence Party and shall not be entitled to vote in the Congress. The Southern Executive Branch shall have no administrative authority over the internal affairs of any affiliated State Southern Independence Party. The SEB shall coordinate and/or assist the various Affiliated State Parties on matters of election law reporting and membership reporting and the collection of the apportioned levies laid against the various States by the Congress for the funding of the Minimum Annual National Budget or special assessments that might be needful.

Paragraph 2. The Southern Executive Branch (SEB) shall consist of the following officers:

(1) Executive Director who shall lead the Southern Executive Branch and oversee the implementation of the duties assigned to the Southern Executive Branch in the Constitution, the By-Laws, and the Committee Rules or policies established by the Southern Independence Party Congress.

The office of Executive Director shall be filled by the election of either a current SIP Senator or Congressman or a current State Chairman. The Executive Director shall be responsible to see that appropriations are funded and checks dispersed in accordance with the National Minimum Annual Budget and as directed by Bills of Congress which are signed by the National SIP Chairman or by override vote.

There shall only be one person elected to each of the seven (7) below positions, but, as conditions require, assistants may be appointed by the existing elected officers without election by the current members of the Southern Independence Party Congress unless a member thereof files an objection and calls for an election. In such a case the standard 51% of all of the current members of the Southern Independence Party Congress shall be required to sustain such appointment.

The Executive Director may speak to the press on behalf of the entire Southern Independence Party by direction from the National SIP Chairman or he may direct his Director of Public Relations or an SEB Press Secretary to speak to the press, again by leave of the National SIP Chairman. Other officers of the SEB shall require the permission of the Executive Director to speak to the press representing the Southern Independence Party. The Executive Director of the SEB shall prepare information for the National SIP Chairman so that he may issue a State of the National Southern Independence Party address once a year.

(2) Assistant Director who shall complete duties assigned by the Executive Director.

The office of Assistant Director shall be filled by the election of either a current State representative or a current State Chairman or Vice Chairman.

Art. III.

(3) Secretary who shall assist the Treasurer in filling out all reports and keeping records of the Southern Independence Party and shall also complete other duties assigned by the Executive Director and the Party Chairman.

(4) Treasurer who shall be in charge of keeping a National PAC in the state of Texas and all deposits and financial exchanges of the Southern Independence Party, and who also shall complete other duties assigned by the Executive Director. The Treasurer may hire a Book Keeper or CPA as resources allow to assist in accounting. The Treasurer may not disperse funds except upon the approval and/or direction of the Executive Director of the SEB.

(5) A Director of Public Relations who shall be responsible for maintaining an open line of communication concerning the Southern Independence Party, which includes the website and other media, and who shall also issue press releases from time to time as directed by the Executive Director of the Southern Executive Branch and/or the Chairman of the Southern Independence Party Congress and who also shall complete other duties assigned by the Executive Director. A Press Secretary may be hired by the Director of Public Relations as resources allow to assist with press releases and with press interviews.

(6) A Director of Finance who shall handle all fund raising and direct mail operations and who also shall complete other duties assigned by Executive Director.

(7) The Committee-at-large member (CLM) shall maintain records of all activities and issue a report to the Southern Executive Branch Executive Director once a month as required by the Southern Independence Party Congress. The CLM shall also supply names of members to fill vacancies of officers of the Southern Executive Branch to the Executive Director who shall make proposed appointments thereto for the confirmation by a 51% majority vote of all of the Southern Independence Party Congress members. The Committee-at-large member shall also complete other duties assigned by Executive Director.

To be eligible for election as the Committee-at-large member the person must be a current State representative to Congress, or a current state Chairman or Vice Chairman or a previous or retiring Executive Director of the Southern Executive Branch. There shall be only one person acting as the Committee-at-large member, but such Committee-at-large member may, upon approval of the Executive Director, appoint assistants to serve under him without election by the current members of the Southern Independence Party Congress unless a member thereof files an objection and calls for an election. In such a case the standard 51% of all of the current members of Southern Independence Party Congress shall be required to sustain such appointment.

Paragraph 3. The Southern Executive Branch Executive Director shall require regular reports from the Treasurer, the Director of Finance, the Director of Public Relations, The Committee Person at Large and the Secretary. The SEB Executive Director shall make quarterly reports to the National Chairman of the Southern Independence Party, the President of the Senate and the Speaker of the House and shall direct the Secretary to send such to each Congressman and Senator.

Paragraph 4. The tenure of all offices of the SEB shall be one (1) year.

Art. III.

Paragraph 5. Other office requirements and duties shall be defined in the By-Laws and in SEB Rules which will be developed and printed by the Southern Executive Branch.

Paragraph 6. The Executive Director shall have the authority to release officers under him in the SEB and recommend replacements to the Southern Independence Party Congress for election.

SECTION 3: Congressional Oath of Office (Senators and Congressmen)

Paragraph 1. The following shall be the Oath of Office. It shall be signed and submitted according to the guidelines set forth in this Document.

We, the Southern Independence Party, recognizing the right of all peoples to self-determination, seek to restore self-government and independence to the Southern people. We strive to preserve and protect our culture, our principles, our rights, and our persons, all of which are threatened by a central government that refuses to abide by the limitations placed on it by its own Constitution.

I have read, fully understand and ascribe to the officially stated goal of the Southern Independence Party as outlined in the previous paragraph, and with the platform of the Southern Independence Party. I agree to and affirm the belief that we, as members of the Southern Independence Party, are to promote:

(1). A return to the principle of the governmental primacy of the sovereign, independent States; and

(2). Self-determination for the people of the Southern States; and

(3). An expressed, ultimate goal: the complete, permanent separation of the Southern States from the United States of America and the restoration of the Southern republic, the Confederate States of America, to it's rightful place among the nations of the Earth.

(4) Avoidance of attempts at unwarranted centralization of power within the Southern Independence Party or the Federation of States.

By my signature, I hereby affirm and pledge to work to further the goals and platform of the Southern Independence Party. I realize that if I fail to uphold these principles or should be found to have willfully violated the Constitution of the Southern Independence Party or By-Laws thereof, I may be removed from my Southern Independence Party office and may be held liable for breach of contract or of my fiduciary duty.

Member of Congress (or Senate) Witnessed by Congressman (or Senator)

Art. III.

SECTION 4: Eligibility for Congressional Voting

Paragraph 1. Eligibility for Southern Independence Party Congress. Each individual member of Southern Independence Party Congress has one vote in voting processes that involve the Southern Independence Party Congress; provided that an individual is in compliance with the general eligibility requirements (see Paragraph 2 this section).

Paragraph 2. Ineligibility for Voting:

No Southern Independence Party Congressmen or Senator may take part in a National Southern Independence Party - level voting process in any capacity if any of the following numbered items in this paragraph apply to him or her:

(1) The individual's State Southern Independence Party dues are not current at the time of the vote. Return receipt mail from state membership/credentials committees of the various States must be provided at least 10 days prior to a National Southern Independence Party vote or by courier one day prior to such vote to the Secretary of the Southern Executive Branch.

(2) The individual is under State level suspension or expulsion according to the rules and regulations.

(3) If an individual in question is a member of a State party which is not presently affiliated with the Southern Independence Party or not a member at all of the Southern Independence Party such person shall not be allowed to vote in any National Southern Independence Party Caucus or Convention and if they did vote, the vote is not to be counted.

(4) The individual was not elected as a representative from a currently affiliated State party of the Southern Independence Party or official notification has been received of the recall of such representative (Congressman or Senator) by said State Party and therefore such person shall not vote in their respective house of the Congress of the National Southern Independence Party .

SECTION 5: Congressional Voting Procedures

Paragraph 1. The various State representatives making up the Southern Independence Party Congress and the officers elected thereto shall be responsible for proposing and voting on National Southern Independence Party level decisions concerning the Southern Independence Party, within the limitations and with the exceptions set forth in the subsequent paragraphs of this section. Nothing in this section shall be construed as permitting the Southern Independence Party Congress to regulate the internal affairs of the State Southern Independence Parties, except to the extent specifically outlined in this Constitution.

Art. III.

Paragraph 2. The Southern Independence Party Congress shall make decisions by the process usual and customary of a motion followed by a second, then followed by a vote of all members present in whatever format that the vote is taking place; whether in person, by phone, by mail, or by some other communications medium. Bills shall originate in the House of Representatives.

Paragraph 3. All decisions made by the Southern Independence Party Congress shall be announced to the primary voting officers of the State Southern Independence Parties and the state chairman promptly.

Paragraph 4. The following decisions require a vote of not less than 75% of both houses of the members of the Southern Independence Party Congress.

(1) The affiliation status of any state Southern Independence Party.

(2) The affiliation status of the Southern Independence Party with any other group.

(3) Changes in The Party's basic philosophies, goals, general platform and mission statements.

SECTION 6: National Level Political Alliances

Paragraph 1. While political alliances may be discussed and pursued by the Southern Executive Branch, no alliance or affiliation shall be effected without a Constitutional (Charter) Amendment being duly proposed and ratified as defined below allowing and or regulating such alliance.

Paragraph 2. The Southern Independence Party Congress shall advise the Southern Executive Branch Executive Director of the successful ratification or the rejection of any alliance or affiliation so submitted and the Southern Executive Branch Executive Director shall implement the decision.

Art. IV.

ARTICLE IV.

FORMATION OF STATE PARTIES

SECTION 1: States to Organize Southern Independence Parties

Paragraph 1. A founding principle of the Southern Independence Party is the protection of Southern Heritage. It is upon this principle that we initially allow the original fifteen (15) Southern States of the present United States of America to organize a Southern Independence Party that will be recognized on a National level. The people of the following States, as they exist upon the ratification of this document, shall have the right to organize the Southern Independence Party in their respective States in compliance with guidelines set forth in this Constitution.

(1) Alabama

(2) Arkansas

(3) Delaware

(4) Florida

(5) Georgia

(6) Kentucky

(7) Louisiana

(8) Maryland

(9) Mississippi

(10) Missouri

(11) North Carolina

(12) South Carolina

(13) Tennessee

(14) Texas

(15) Virginia

Paragraph 2. In case a State should be placed asunder, the boundaries of the 15 States listed in Paragraph 1 are defined as those existent as of the ratification of this document, and would, therefore be considered the legitimate boundary of the State in question.

Paragraph 3. Nothing herein shall be construed as prohibiting the formation and affiliation of groups or chapters of Southern Independence Party members, friends, and supporters residing outside the South, in the Northern States or in foreign countries in a non-voting supporter capacity only; otherwise their presence and privileges are to be determined by a committee of Congress the whole.

Paragraph 4. The Southern Independence Party Congress retains the right to recognize other States that may have the essence of Southern culture and heritage. In order to include a State in the Southern Independence Party, the Southern Independence Party Congress in open convention must amend the Constitution through the proper, specified amendment and ratification process.

Art. IV.

Paragraph 5. The following additions of States to be allowed to organize provisional State Southern Independence Parties for later affiliation with the Southern Independence Party at this time are:

(16) New Mexico (19) Wyoming (22) Montana

(17) Arizona (20) Kansas (23) Nevada

(18) Colorado (21) Oklahoma (24) West Virginia

Paragraph 6. No organization shall be affiliated with the Southern Independence Party when such organization does not represent the distinctiveness of Southern Heritage or the essence thereof nor may any organization become affiliated with the Southern Independence Party that does not represent the Principles of the Southern Independence Party. States' parties are expected to use similar caution in making political alliances which should be done by the approval of a State caucus.

SECTION 2: The Appointment of Provisional State Chairmen

Paragraph 1. All new State Southern Independence Parties must have a Provisional Chairman until such time as the State party membership can hold proper elections. The Chairman of the Federation of States (who is elected by the various Federated State Chairmen) will appoint the Provisional Chairmen by recommendation of the Southern Independence Party Congress members and/or other State Chairmen.

Paragraph 2. The Process of appointing Provisional State Chairmen shall proceed according to these guidelines:

The person who wishes to be appointed shall establish contact with Federation of States by either of two means:

(1) Directly:

The person may contact the Federation of States through the Internet, the U.S. Postal Service, or by telephone, or personal contact.

(2) Indirectly:

The person seeking an appointment as a Provisional State Chairman of a new State Southern Independence Party may have a member of an existing State SIP notify the Federation of States or the State Chairman involved, or a member of the Southern Independence Party Congress, or other officer. The Candidate for Appointment shall be interviewed by the Federation of States and such other people involved in organizing such new State party.

Art. IV.

(3) Interviewing the candidate should take no more than one business week.

(4) A Copy of the appointment documents shall be given also to the Southern Independence Party Congress and to the Chairmen of the several State parties.

Paragraph 3. A Provisional State Chairman shall be appointed in States without a Southern Independence Party. A Provisional State Chairman may not be appointed to a State that has an affiliated Southern Independence Party but that has no State Chairman until such State has ample time (not less than 45 days) in which to elect a replacement Chairman. In cases of disaffiliation by a State Southern Independence Party, that State shall be considered without a Southern Independence Party or a State Chairman after a period of three (3) months.

Paragraph 4. Any Federated State that may develop vacancies in their required officers shall have a reasonable amount of time (45 days) to fill such vacancies by interim election according to their individual State Constitutions. A State that continues to operate without fulfilling the five requirements below within six (6) months of the vacancy or deficiency, shall be considered for disaffiliation with the Southern Independence Party, or revert to a provisional status if requested by such State Party.

(1.) Must have a PAC or Party filed

(2.) Must have a Treasurer

(3.) Must have a bank account

(4.) Must be one of the 15 Southern States or as provided in ARTICLE IV, Section 1 or one of the of the nine (9) exceptional States listed in ARTICLE IV, Section 5.

(5.) Must have a State Chairman, either provisionally appointed by the Federation of States, selected previously organized by other means as a State group or party or elected as State Chairman in accordance with State law.

(6) If a State Party is voted into disaffiliation status for the above causes of not meeting all the requirements, dues collected from membership should be sent to the Southern Executive Branch and that State's portion of the Federation Funding allowed to States with provisional organizations shall be deposited in an escrow account to be used to help build the Southern Independence Party in that state. Once the State meets all the requirements again the monies will be turned over to the State treasury.

Paragraph 4. The Federation of States shall be responsible for installing the new provisional State Chairman and will assist such provisional State Chairman in organizing his provisional staff and pla

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest